Falls Prevention Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 1 Issue 7

08/12/2010
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Fall Scene Investigation strategy enhances patient safety and quality of care

03/12/2010

Source: Nursing  2010 40(8) p.67

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: August 2010

In a nutshell: USA based Camden-Clark Memorial Hospital’s fall prevention team has recently implemented a fall scene investigation (FSI) as a performance improvement strategy to prevent falls. The focus of the FSI is to analyze each fall and implement new initiatives to avoid future falls. This article describes how FSI enhances patient safety and quality of care.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Helping to prevent falls in hospital – Royal Free Hospital leaflet

03/12/2010

Source: NHS Evidence

Follow this link for full text

Publication type: Leaflet

In a nutshell: The Royal Free Hospital in London have produced a leaflet aimed at patients’ relatives on what they can do to help themselves and their relatives from falling during visiting time.

Lenght of publication: Double sided leaflet


Interventions for preventing falls in acute- and chronic-care hospitals: a systematic review and meta-analysis

03/12/2010

Source (DARE review): Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) 
Source (Original review): Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 2010 56(1)  p. 29-36

Follow this link for full CRD review 

Follow this link for abstract

Dat of publication: November 2010

Publication Type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: A systematic review to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of interventions for preventing falls in acute-care and chronic-care hospitals  found no conclusive evidence that hospital fall prevention programmes  reduce the number of falls or patients who fell.  Some individual interventions however were found to significantly reduce falls.  The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination’s comments do warn that the authors’ conclusions should be treated with caution in view of potential limitations arising from the review process, the low quality of included trials, and the varied nature of the interventions.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Use of temporary nurses and nurse and patient safety outcomes in acute care hospital units

01/12/2010

Source: Health Care Management Review, 35(4), 1 October 2010, p333-344.

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2010

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study examined links between the use of temporary nursing staff and nurse and patient safety outcomes based on 4,954 nurses working across 142 hospitals. The main findings suggested that nurses working on nursing units with high levels of temporary staff reported greater levels of patient falls and were more likely to report back injuries. The authors suggest an optimum level of temporary nurse staffing of 15% to ensure both nurse and patient safety outcomes.

Length of publication: 1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Patient education to prevent falls among older hospital inpatients

01/12/2010

Source: Archives of Internal Medicine, published online 22 November 2010.

Follow this link for the full text

Date of publication: November 2010

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study compared two types of multimedia patient education with usual care for the prevention of falls among in-patients at two Australian hospitals. 401 patients were given the full intervention comprising videos, written materials and one-to-one follow up whilst 424 patients received just the education materials. A third group of 381 patients received usual care comprising checklists, alert systems and risk screening. Data was collected using incident reports, medical records and patient interviews. A total of 247 patient fell during the study period, 97 of which sustained injuries. The study found that the rate of falls per 1,000 days per patient did not differ significantly between the three groups. However, falls were less frequent among cognitively intact patients given the full intervention than among cognitively intact patients receiving just the education materials or those in the control group.

Length of publication: 1 web page

Aknowledgement: Personalised multimedia proram may help prevent falls in patients without cognitive impairment, 23 November 2010, Science Centric


Fall prevention and vitamin D in the elderly: an overview of the key role of the non-bone effects

01/12/2010

Source: Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation, 7(50), 2010.

Follow this link for the full text

Date of publication: October 2010

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This review examined the falls literature over a fifteen year period. The effects of vitamin D on muscles and the central nervous system are discussed as major factors in reducing fall and bone fracture rates. Based on this evidence, the authors recommend prescribing elderly patients 800 IU of vitamin D daily and the integration of vitamin D supplementation into primary and secondary fall prevention strategies.

Length of publication: 1 web page

Aknowledgement: New research on falls prevention, 16 November 2010, National Council on Aging website


Further Dissemination

01/12/2010

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