Falls Prevention Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 6 Issue 10

19/10/2016
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Video Monitoring to Reduce Falls And Patient Companion Costs For Adult Inpatients

19/10/2016

Source: Nursing Economics

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: Jul/Aug 2016 34(4) pps. 185-189.

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2013), the financial cost of a fall with injury in an older adult is estimated at $17,500. In response to these risks, nurses often turn to 1:1 patient companions as an intervention to prevent falls (Rochefort, Ward, Ritchie, Girard, & Tamblyn, 2012). Because of the expense of 1:1 patient companions, remote video monitoring has become an attractive option to reduce falls as it allows one telesitter to observe and verbally redirect multiple patients from a remote location.

 Length of publication: four pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Identifying motivators and barriers to older community-dwelling people participating in resistance training: a cross-sectional study

19/10/2016

Source: Journal of Sports Science 

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 25th August 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Participation rates of older people in resistance training (RT) are low despite increasing research showing many health benefits. To increase the number of older people participating in RT it is important to know what would motivate people to become involved, what motivates those who participate to continue, and the factors preventing many older people from commencing participation.

 Length of publication: ten pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Shared decision making to improve the emergency care of older adults: a research agenda

19/10/2016

Source: Academic Emergency Medicine 

Follow this link for the abstract 

Date of publication: 26th August 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Older emergency department patients have high rates of serious illness and injury, are at high risk for side effects and adverse events from treatments and diagnostic tests, and in many cases, have nuanced goals of care in which pursuing the most aggressive approach is not desired. Although some forms of shared decision making (SDM) are commonly practiced by emergency physicians caring for older adults, broader use of SDM in this setting is limited by a lack of knowledge of the types of patients and conditions for which SDM is most helpful and the approaches and tools that can best facilitate this process. This article describes a research agenda to generate new knowledge in order to optimize the use of SDM during the emergency care of older adults.

 Length of publication: 34 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Preventing falls in older people: assessment and interventions

19/10/2016

Source: Nursing Standard

Follow this link for the abstract      

Date of publication: Aug 31-Sep 6; 25(52):50-5; quiz 56

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls can have a devastating effect on older people. Physical injury and fear of further falls may restrict social and physical activities, leading to a lack of confidence and social isolation. Nurses need to assess patients who have fallen to identify injury as well as to instigate appropriate interventions to reduce the risk of further falls. This article provides an overview of the assessment tools and management strategies that can be used in daily practice, particularly in the community setting.

 Length of publication: five pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Preoperative Falls Predict Postoperative Falls, Functional Decline, and Surgical Complications

19/10/2016

Source: EBioMedicine, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common and linked to morbidity. This study’s objectives were to characterize postoperative falls, and determine whether preoperative falls independently predicted postoperative falls (primary outcome), functional dependence, quality of life, complications, and readmission. It concluded that falls are common after surgery, and preoperative falls herald postoperative falls and other adverse outcomes. A history of preoperative falls should be routinely ascertained.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Body mass index, falls, and injurious falls among U.S. adults

19/10/2016

Source: Preventive Medicine, 2016, Vol 91 p. 217-223

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are an important health concern because they are associated with loss of independence and disability, particularly among women. This study determined the age- and sex-specific prevalence of injurious falls among adults in the United States and examined the impact of obesity on fall risk. Not only are mid-life women at high risk for falls, but the class II/III obesity is a risk factor for injurious falls. Targeting mid-life women for fall and injury prevention is an important aim for practitioners, particularly given unique correlates of falling for this group.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Predictive Factors for Inpatient Falls among Children with Cerebral Palsy

19/10/2016

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Inpatient falls are of significant concern. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. A total of 93 patients with cerebral palsy were assessed based on a variety of tests. The study found that children with cerebral palsy may experience inpatient falls, but further studies are required in order to develop prevention programs. For patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy, these results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effectiveness of medication withdrawal in older fallers: results from the Improving Medication Prescribing to reduce Risk Of FALLs (IMPROveFALL) trial

19/10/2016

Source: Age and Ageing 

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 10 September 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This paper investigates the effect of withdrawal of fall-risk-increasing-drugs (FRIDs) versus ‘care as usual’ on reducing falls in community-dwelling older fallers.

 Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Predicting first fall in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease: insights from a fall-naïve cohort

19/10/2016

Source: Movement Disorders

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 13 September 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study identifies risk factors for first fall for 36 months in a newly diagnosed, falls-naïve cohort.

 Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Implementing an evidence-based fall prevention intervention in community senior centers

19/10/2016

Source: The American Journal of Public Health 

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 15  September 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of implementing an evidence-based fall prevention intervention in community senior centers.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Predictive factors for inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy

19/10/2016

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This prospective study looked into the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. It found that behavioural problems (according to the mother’s statement), inability to maintain a long sitting position, ability to balance unsupported on knees, a history of frequent falls and a negative Thomas test were likely to increase the risk of falls. These results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission, though further studies are required to develop prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Adaptive gait responses to an impending fall during treadmill walking

19/10/2016

Source: Gait and Posture, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Humans have been shown to adapt their gait when aware of potential slip risks when walking, though it is unknown if these adaptations also happen on a treadmill. This study sought investigate this possibility. It found that humans do adapt their gait when aware of possible risks compared to normal walking, by taking shorter steps and flattening their feet on impact, as well as repositioning their body centre. This could provide insights into dynamic stability control when individuals anticipate potential slip risk when treadmill walking.

Length of publication: 23 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Further dissemination

19/10/2016

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