Fall risk assessment: retrospective analysis of Morse Fall Scale scores

14/03/2016

Source: Applied Nursing Research, 2016, Vol 31 p. 34-40

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The Morse Fall Scale is used in several care settings for fall risk assessment and supports the implementation of preventive nursing interventions. This study aims to analyse its scores to compare patient characteristics, diagnoses and lengths of stay, looking at elderly female patients in Portugal. There were no statistical differences in Morse Fall Scale score between the first and the last assessment.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Does action follow intention in falls prevention exercise programs?

14/03/2016

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2016, Vol 64 p. 151-161

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May-June 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Exercise for falls prevention is effective but limited in real life. This study examines this relationship, looking at which factors affect participation in group and home-based falls prevention exercise. It found that perception of effectiveness and previous exposure to the exercise intervention most strongly predicted future participation. More people who do not want to participate in home exercise actually participate in home exercise than people who do not want to participate in group exercise that actually do. It may be easier to convince people who do not want to participate in falls prevention exercise to participate in a home program.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


More laboratory-induced slips occur among obese individuals

14/03/2016

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Slip falls can be serious, estimated to cause 40-50% of all fall related injuries. Epidemiological data indicates that older and obese adults experience more falls than young, non-obese individuals. This study investigated the effects of obesity and age on slip severity from laboratory-induced slips. Obesity did not affect slip distance, slip duration or peak slip speed, but obese individuals were more than eight times more likely to experience a fall than non-obese individuals when adjusting for certain factors. These results indicate that obesity may be a significant risk factor for experiencing slip-induced falls.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Further dissemination

14/03/2016

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