Falls Prevention Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 7 Issue 6

16/06/2017
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The effectiveness of intervention programs for preventing patients from falls

16/06/2017

Source: Kontakt, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This is a review article to summarise the conclusions of different studies about the effectiveness of hospital fall prevention programmes from the last five years. Twelve studies made it into the final review, and the most mentioned strategy was education of patients and staff. Effectiveness depends on factors like compliance, leadership, team training and IT support, amongst others.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Dance movement therapy and falls prevention

16/06/2017

Source: Maturitas, 2017, Vol 102 p. 1-5

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people which may improve various health outcomes in this population such as balance, gait and muscle performance. This study conducted a systematic review considering all RCTs investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. In two out of three RCTs, dancing improved this. However, there is a paucity of studies on dancing and falls, so the evidence is preliminary and equivocal.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this lik to find your local NHS Library.


Knowledge, behavioural practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: implications for prevention programs

16/06/2017

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2017, Vol 72 p. 19-24

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September-October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls prevention has been well-studied, but the focus is usually on indoor falls rather than outdoor. Older adults’ knowledge of outdoor risk factors and fall prevention practices have not been examined. This study sought to fill that gap and inform the development of a prevention program by exploring experiences of older adults.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Measurement of lying and standing blood pressure in hospital as part of falls prevention programme for older people

16/06/2017

Source: Age and Ageing 

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2017 vol. 46(suppl_1): pps. i1-i22.

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A comprehensive national audit in 2015 of 4,846 patients aged 65+ from acute hospitals in England and Wales showed that only 16% of inpatients had their lying and standing blood pressure (LSBP) measured by the third day of admission. Orthostatic hypotension is common in older people, particularly during acute illness. It can therefore increase the risk of a fall in hospital.

Length of publication: 22 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

 


An interactive videogame for arm and hand exercise in people with Parkinson’s disease: a randomized controlled trial

16/06/2017

Source: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders

Follow this link for the abstract 

Date of publication: 15th May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have difficulty performing upper extremity (UE) activities. The aim of this study was to investigate if exergames targeting the UE improve arm and hand activities and impairments and to establish the acceptability and feasibility of these games in people with PD.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.