Dance movement therapy and falls prevention

16/06/2017

Source: Maturitas, 2017, Vol 102 p. 1-5

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people which may improve various health outcomes in this population such as balance, gait and muscle performance. This study conducted a systematic review considering all RCTs investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. In two out of three RCTs, dancing improved this. However, there is a paucity of studies on dancing and falls, so the evidence is preliminary and equivocal.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this lik to find your local NHS Library.


Knowledge, behavioural practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: implications for prevention programs

16/06/2017

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2017, Vol 72 p. 19-24

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September-October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls prevention has been well-studied, but the focus is usually on indoor falls rather than outdoor. Older adults’ knowledge of outdoor risk factors and fall prevention practices have not been examined. This study sought to fill that gap and inform the development of a prevention program by exploring experiences of older adults.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Parkinsonian signs are a risk factor for falls

17/05/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017 p. 1-5

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This cohort study looked at how likely people with Parkinson’s disease were to fall compared to those without, as Parkinsonian symptoms are common in older adults and are associated with increased rates of dementia and mortality. Even adjusting for age, cognitive function and co-morbidities, those with signs were still 38% more likely to fall than those without, and those falls were also more likely to lead to injury. Parkinsonian signs are a significant and independent risk factor for falls, and early detection is essential to implement fall prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Depressive symptomatology and fall risk among community-dwelling older adults

18/04/2017

Source: Social Science & Medicine, 2017, Vol 178 p. 206-213

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common among older adults and may be related to depressive symptoms (DS). With advancing age, there is an onset of chronic conditions, sensory impairments, and activity limitations that are associated with falls and with depressive disorders. Prior cross-sectional studies have observed significant associations between DS and subsequent falls as well as between fractures and subsequent clinical depression and DS. Using sophisticated methods and a large U.S. sample, this study found larger magnitudes of effect in the DS-falls relationship than in prior studies—highlighting the risk of falls for older adults with DS.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


An integrative review of pediatric fall risk assessment tools

18/04/2017

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient fall prevention begins with accurate risk assessment. However, sustained improvements in prevention and quality of care include use of validated fall risk assessment tools (FRATs) to identify patients at highest risk. Adult FRATs are often used to create tools for pediatric patients. However, adult FRATs do not adequately assess risk in children, and pediatric FRATs have not been found to be reliable and valid across institutions and diverse populations. This review highlights the importance of choosing a FRAT based on an institution’s identified risk factors and validating the tool for one’s own patient population.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Falling while walking: a hidden contributor to pedestrian injury

17/03/2017

Source: Accident Analysis & Prevention, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This Australian study looks at the fall risk to pedestrians, given how beneficial and sustainable walking is as a mode of transport. Falling while walking may be a significant contributor to pedestrian injuries (the World Health Organisation has identified falls as the second-leading cause of unintentional injury death in older people) but little research has looked into this issue.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of obesity in recovering stability after a treadmill slip

21/02/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effects of obesity on falls and dynamic stability control in young adults subjected to a standardized treadmill-induced gait-slip. Trials were categorized as a fall or recovery based on the reliance of the subject on external support following the slip. Compared with the normal-weight group, the obese group demonstrated less relative muscle strength and fell more after the slip. Obese people’s dynamic stability after slip was impaired possibly due to the inability of controlling the trunk segment’s backward lean movement. Obesity therefore most likely influences ability to recover from slips. Interventions must be aimed at balance recovery among individuals with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Spinal mobility and alignment leading to lower QoL and falling

21/02/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017, Volume 53 p. 98-103

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Spinal deformities can affect quality of life (QOL) and risk of falling, but no studies have explored the relationships of spinal mobility and sagittal alignment of spine and the lower extremities simultaneously. Purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship of those postural parameters to QOL and risk of falling. Forward-stooped posture and knee-flexion deformity could be important indicator of lower QOL. Moreover, limited extension in the lumbar spine could be a useful screening examination for fall prevention in the elderly.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effectiveness of falls prevention programs for reducing diabetic risk factors

17/11/2016

Source: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, 2016, online

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Date of publication: October 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that increases falls risk in the elderly. Prevention programs with a component of weight-bearing exercises are effective in decreasing future falls. However, weight-bearing exercise was only recently recommended in guidelines for exercise for these patients. There have since been many studies evaluating the effectiveness of such programs on this population. Evidence suggests that people with T2DM and DPN can improve their balance and walking after a targeted multicomponent program, though it is yet unknown whether they resulted in a decreased falls risk in the community.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contract your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Preoperative Falls Predict Postoperative Falls, Functional Decline, and Surgical Complications

19/10/2016

Source: EBioMedicine, 2016, online

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common and linked to morbidity. This study’s objectives were to characterize postoperative falls, and determine whether preoperative falls independently predicted postoperative falls (primary outcome), functional dependence, quality of life, complications, and readmission. It concluded that falls are common after surgery, and preoperative falls herald postoperative falls and other adverse outcomes. A history of preoperative falls should be routinely ascertained.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Body mass index, falls, and injurious falls among U.S. adults

19/10/2016

Source: Preventive Medicine, 2016, Vol 91 p. 217-223

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are an important health concern because they are associated with loss of independence and disability, particularly among women. This study determined the age- and sex-specific prevalence of injurious falls among adults in the United States and examined the impact of obesity on fall risk. Not only are mid-life women at high risk for falls, but the class II/III obesity is a risk factor for injurious falls. Targeting mid-life women for fall and injury prevention is an important aim for practitioners, particularly given unique correlates of falling for this group.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Predictive Factors for Inpatient Falls among Children with Cerebral Palsy

19/10/2016

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Inpatient falls are of significant concern. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. A total of 93 patients with cerebral palsy were assessed based on a variety of tests. The study found that children with cerebral palsy may experience inpatient falls, but further studies are required in order to develop prevention programs. For patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy, these results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Predictive factors for inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy

19/10/2016

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This prospective study looked into the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. It found that behavioural problems (according to the mother’s statement), inability to maintain a long sitting position, ability to balance unsupported on knees, a history of frequent falls and a negative Thomas test were likely to increase the risk of falls. These results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission, though further studies are required to develop prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Preventing falls for a person with dementia

15/08/2016

Source: Crisis Prevention Institute

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Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: Falls are a danger to a person with dementia, and a cause of alarm to family and professional caregivers. Wherever the person lives, and no matter what stage of dementia the person is living with, falls must—and can—be prevented due to their high-risk status and the difficulty associated with recovery. Evidence indicates that multifactorial approaches are beneficial. Collaborating with an occupational therapist (OT) trained in dementia care is essential, as they will discover the client’s cognitive level and focus on remaining abilities, as well as task modification, environmental adaptation and enhanced communication.

Length of publication: 1 page