Quick adjustments during gait are less accurate through focal cerebellar lesions

17/10/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017, Volume 58 p. 390-393

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Online gait corrections are frequently used to restore gait stability and prevent falling. They require shorter response times than voluntary movements which suggests that subcortical pathways contribute to the execution of online gait corrections. To evaluate the cerebellum in these pathways two hypotheses were tested around accuracy of online gait corrections and the pronouncement of differences. The reduced ability to accurately adjust foot placement during walking in individuals with focal cerebellar lesions appears to be a general movement control deficit, which could contribute to increased fall risk.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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Self-powered fall detection system using pressure sensing triboelectric nanogenerators

17/10/2017

Source: Nano Energy, 2017, Vol. 41 p. 139-147

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Fall detection is becoming more important as the number of older people in society increases. People may fall at home where there is little timely help available, and falls themselves can cause injuries. Most fall detection technologies are inconvenient to wear, and visual or movement-based ones can be expensive and difficult to install. This study proposes a falls-detection system based on a pressure-sensing triboelectric nanogenerator array, which is cost-effective and ambient-based. It achieves a classification accuracy of 95.75% in identifying actual falls, and can be immediately installed due to low costs.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Strategies to prevent falls and injuries among older adults

15/09/2017

Source: Nursing Clinics of North America, 2017, Volume 52 no 3 p. 489-497

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls in older adults are the leading cause of injuries, and community-dwelling older adults should have an annual fall risk screening/assessment. This article looks at both clinical and community-based strategies from several different evidence-based programs to raise awareness in older adults in the community about falls, about increasing strength and balance, and to address the fear of falling.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Reducing falls can help trusts improve patient experience and reduce costs

17/08/2017

Source: NHS Improvement, 2017

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: This report from NHS Improvement provides a picture of the scale of inpatient falls and the benefits to the NHS if the rate in hospitals was reduced. It followed the successful completion of their collaboration between 19 trusts to adopt improvement methodologies and creating a learning community to discuss changes. Results include the observation that older patients represent 77% of total falls, but 87% of total costs – reducing this group by around 25-30% could result in annual savings of up to £170m.

Length of publication: 1 page


Pilot Testing Fall TIPS (Tailoring Interventions for Patient Safety)

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient falls during an acute hospitalization cause injury, reduced mobility, and increased costs. The laminated paper Fall TIPS Toolkit (Fall TIPS) provides clinical decision support at the bedside by linking each patient’s fall risk assessment with evidence-based interventions. Strategies were needed to integrate this evidence into clinical practice.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Dance movement therapy and falls prevention

16/06/2017

Source: Maturitas, 2017, Vol 102 p. 1-5

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people which may improve various health outcomes in this population such as balance, gait and muscle performance. This study conducted a systematic review considering all RCTs investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. In two out of three RCTs, dancing improved this. However, there is a paucity of studies on dancing and falls, so the evidence is preliminary and equivocal.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this lik to find your local NHS Library.


Knowledge, behavioural practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: implications for prevention programs

16/06/2017

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2017, Vol 72 p. 19-24

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September-October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls prevention has been well-studied, but the focus is usually on indoor falls rather than outdoor. Older adults’ knowledge of outdoor risk factors and fall prevention practices have not been examined. This study sought to fill that gap and inform the development of a prevention program by exploring experiences of older adults.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Parkinsonian signs are a risk factor for falls

17/05/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017 p. 1-5

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This cohort study looked at how likely people with Parkinson’s disease were to fall compared to those without, as Parkinsonian symptoms are common in older adults and are associated with increased rates of dementia and mortality. Even adjusting for age, cognitive function and co-morbidities, those with signs were still 38% more likely to fall than those without, and those falls were also more likely to lead to injury. Parkinsonian signs are a significant and independent risk factor for falls, and early detection is essential to implement fall prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Depressive symptomatology and fall risk among community-dwelling older adults

18/04/2017

Source: Social Science & Medicine, 2017, Vol 178 p. 206-213

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common among older adults and may be related to depressive symptoms (DS). With advancing age, there is an onset of chronic conditions, sensory impairments, and activity limitations that are associated with falls and with depressive disorders. Prior cross-sectional studies have observed significant associations between DS and subsequent falls as well as between fractures and subsequent clinical depression and DS. Using sophisticated methods and a large U.S. sample, this study found larger magnitudes of effect in the DS-falls relationship than in prior studies—highlighting the risk of falls for older adults with DS.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


An integrative review of pediatric fall risk assessment tools

18/04/2017

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient fall prevention begins with accurate risk assessment. However, sustained improvements in prevention and quality of care include use of validated fall risk assessment tools (FRATs) to identify patients at highest risk. Adult FRATs are often used to create tools for pediatric patients. However, adult FRATs do not adequately assess risk in children, and pediatric FRATs have not been found to be reliable and valid across institutions and diverse populations. This review highlights the importance of choosing a FRAT based on an institution’s identified risk factors and validating the tool for one’s own patient population.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Falling while walking: a hidden contributor to pedestrian injury

17/03/2017

Source: Accident Analysis & Prevention, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This Australian study looks at the fall risk to pedestrians, given how beneficial and sustainable walking is as a mode of transport. Falling while walking may be a significant contributor to pedestrian injuries (the World Health Organisation has identified falls as the second-leading cause of unintentional injury death in older people) but little research has looked into this issue.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of obesity in recovering stability after a treadmill slip

21/02/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effects of obesity on falls and dynamic stability control in young adults subjected to a standardized treadmill-induced gait-slip. Trials were categorized as a fall or recovery based on the reliance of the subject on external support following the slip. Compared with the normal-weight group, the obese group demonstrated less relative muscle strength and fell more after the slip. Obese people’s dynamic stability after slip was impaired possibly due to the inability of controlling the trunk segment’s backward lean movement. Obesity therefore most likely influences ability to recover from slips. Interventions must be aimed at balance recovery among individuals with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Spinal mobility and alignment leading to lower QoL and falling

21/02/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017, Volume 53 p. 98-103

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Spinal deformities can affect quality of life (QOL) and risk of falling, but no studies have explored the relationships of spinal mobility and sagittal alignment of spine and the lower extremities simultaneously. Purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship of those postural parameters to QOL and risk of falling. Forward-stooped posture and knee-flexion deformity could be important indicator of lower QOL. Moreover, limited extension in the lumbar spine could be a useful screening examination for fall prevention in the elderly.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effectiveness of falls prevention programs for reducing diabetic risk factors

17/11/2016

Source: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that increases falls risk in the elderly. Prevention programs with a component of weight-bearing exercises are effective in decreasing future falls. However, weight-bearing exercise was only recently recommended in guidelines for exercise for these patients. There have since been many studies evaluating the effectiveness of such programs on this population. Evidence suggests that people with T2DM and DPN can improve their balance and walking after a targeted multicomponent program, though it is yet unknown whether they resulted in a decreased falls risk in the community.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contract your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.