Reducing falls can help trusts improve patient experience and reduce costs

17/08/2017

Source: NHS Improvement, 2017

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: This report from NHS Improvement provides a picture of the scale of inpatient falls and the benefits to the NHS if the rate in hospitals was reduced. It followed the successful completion of their collaboration between 19 trusts to adopt improvement methodologies and creating a learning community to discuss changes. Results include the observation that older patients represent 77% of total falls, but 87% of total costs – reducing this group by around 25-30% could result in annual savings of up to £170m.

Length of publication: 1 page


Development and delivery of an exercise programme for falls prevention

17/08/2017

Source: Physiotherapy, 2017, online

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This paper describes the development and implementation of an exercise intervention to prevent falls within The Prevention of Fall Injury Trial (PreFIT), which is a large multi-centred randomised controlled trial based in the UK National Health Service (NHS). The exercise programme targets lower limb strength and balance, which are known, modifiable risk factors for falling.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Mid Yorks NHS Trust adopts physio-designed training to prevent falls

17/08/2017

Source: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, 2017, online

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News article

In a nutshell: Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust has launched falls prevention training for staff which recreates real-life situations in allocated sections of actual wards and clinics.

Length of publication: 1 page


The evolution of a community-wide interprofessional fall prevention partnership

17/07/2017

Source: Journal of Interprofessional Education and Practice, 2017, Vol 8 p. 47-51

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Date of publication: September 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Despite a focus on interprofessional (IP) approaches to healthcare, many providers, researchers and community programs continue to operate in silos. This is not only inefficient and costly, but also inconducive to knowledge translation. This study aimed to describe how fall prevention was the vehicle for developing a focused community-wide interprofessional partnership. The framework presented may be helpful to other communities/programs focused on developing interprofessional approaches to evidence-based chronic condition management.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Investigation of floor surface finishes for optimal slip resistance performance

14/07/2017

Source: Health and Safety at Work, 2017, online

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Increasing slip resistance of the floor surface would be desirable, but there is a lack of evidence as to whether traction properties are linearly correlated with topographic features of floor surfaces or what scales of surface roughness are required to effectively control slipperiness of the floor. The results of this study with previous findings confirm that floor surface finishes require different levels of surface coarseness for different types of environmental conditions to effectively manage slippery walking environments.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Welsh Ambulance Service distributes CSP’s falls prevention booklet

14/07/2017

Source: Chartered Society of Physiotherapists website

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News press release

In a nutshell: Patients using non-emergency transport vehicles in Wales are receiving copies of the CSP’s Get Up and Go booklet about how to avoid falls. ‘Developed by Saga in association with the CSP, it covers a range of falls prevention aspects and includes exercises for strength and balance, as well as guidance about getting up from a fall.’

Length of publication: 1 page


Does perturbation training prevent falls after discharge from stroke rehabilitation?

14/07/2017

Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebro-Vascular Diseases, 2017, online

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Individuals with stroke fall frequently, and no exercise intervention has been shown to prevent falls post stroke. Perturbation-based balance training (PBT), which involves practicing reactions to instability, shows promise for preventing falls in older adults and individuals with Parkinson’s disease. This study aimed to determine if PBT during inpatient stroke rehabilitation can prevent falls after discharge into the community. These findings suggest that PBT is promising for reducing falls post stroke. While this was not a randomized controlled trial, this study may provide sufficient evidence for implementing PBT in stroke rehabilitation practice.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Evaluation of falls sensor technology in acute care

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Sensor technology that dynamically identifies hospitalized patients’ fall risk and detects and alerts nurses of high-risk patients’ early exits out of bed has potential for reducing fall rates and preventing patient harm. In this study, a sensor was evaluated on two inpatient medical units to study fall characteristics and then to assign patient fall probability. A fall detection sensor system affords a level of surveillance that standard fall alert systems do not have. Fall prevention remains a complex issue, but sensor technology is a viable fall prevention option.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The effectiveness of intervention programs for preventing patients from falls

16/06/2017

Source: Kontakt, 2017, online

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This is a review article to summarise the conclusions of different studies about the effectiveness of hospital fall prevention programmes from the last five years. Twelve studies made it into the final review, and the most mentioned strategy was education of patients and staff. Effectiveness depends on factors like compliance, leadership, team training and IT support, amongst others.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of an ICT-based fall-prevention system in community-dwelling older adults

16/06/2017

Source: International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 2017, Vol 106 p. 10-25

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Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A sedentary lifestyle and low levels of physical activity are major factors in fall risk for older adults. ICT-based interventions could possibly counteract the risk for this group, as studies show that such interventions significantly reduce it. However, this population is heterogeneous, and several factors (such as gender, age, fitness and others) may influence the use of these systems. This study analyses the iStoppFalls system, testing effectiveness and usage indicators, among other things.

Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Long-term effectiveness of a multifactorial program in Bavarian nursing homes

16/06/2017

Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2017, Vol 18, no 6, p. 552.e7-552.e17

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Femoral fractures are frequently consequences of falls in nursing homes and are associated with considerable costs and unfavorable outcomes such as immobility and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effectiveness of a multifactorial fall and fracture prevention program in nursing homes in terms of reducing femoral fractures.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A hierarchical alarm model for elderly fall prevention sensors

17/05/2017

Source: Pervasive and Mobile Computing, 2017, online

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: New technologies allow for automatic monitoring of hospitalised older people, helping clinical staff to supervise to reduce falls. This paper introduces a hierarchical model to predict alarming states in a sensor worn over clothes. The hierarchy predicts levels of danger to warn clinical staff of possible fall danger.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to  find your local NHS Library.


Dopamine depletion in Parkinsons alters brain processing, impairing gait automaticity

18/04/2017

Source: NeuroImage, 2017, Vol 152 p. 207-220

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Impairments in motor automaticity cause patients with Parkinson’s disease to rely on attentional resources during gait, resulting in greater motor variability and a higher risk of falls. Although dopaminergic circuitry is known to play an important role in motor automaticity, little evidence exists on the neural mechanisms underlying the breakdown of locomotor automaticity in Parkinson’s disease. Overall, this study demonstrates that dopamine ameliorates gait automaticity in Parkinson’s disease by altering striatal, limbic and cerebellar processing, thereby informing future therapeutic avenues for gait and falls prevention.

Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Falls and fractures: consensus statement

17/03/2017

Source: Government website, 2017

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Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Guidance

In a nutshell: Public Health England have published new guidance on falls and fractures around supporting commissioning for prevention. It outlines approaches to interventions and activities helping to prevent falls and fractures to improve health outcomes for older people