Does perturbation training prevent falls after discharge from stroke rehabilitation?

14/07/2017

Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebro-Vascular Diseases, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Individuals with stroke fall frequently, and no exercise intervention has been shown to prevent falls post stroke. Perturbation-based balance training (PBT), which involves practicing reactions to instability, shows promise for preventing falls in older adults and individuals with Parkinson’s disease. This study aimed to determine if PBT during inpatient stroke rehabilitation can prevent falls after discharge into the community. These findings suggest that PBT is promising for reducing falls post stroke. While this was not a randomized controlled trial, this study may provide sufficient evidence for implementing PBT in stroke rehabilitation practice.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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Pilot Testing Fall TIPS (Tailoring Interventions for Patient Safety)

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient falls during an acute hospitalization cause injury, reduced mobility, and increased costs. The laminated paper Fall TIPS Toolkit (Fall TIPS) provides clinical decision support at the bedside by linking each patient’s fall risk assessment with evidence-based interventions. Strategies were needed to integrate this evidence into clinical practice.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Evaluation of falls sensor technology in acute care

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Sensor technology that dynamically identifies hospitalized patients’ fall risk and detects and alerts nurses of high-risk patients’ early exits out of bed has potential for reducing fall rates and preventing patient harm. In this study, a sensor was evaluated on two inpatient medical units to study fall characteristics and then to assign patient fall probability. A fall detection sensor system affords a level of surveillance that standard fall alert systems do not have. Fall prevention remains a complex issue, but sensor technology is a viable fall prevention option.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of vibration training in reducing risk of slip-related falls among young adults with obesity

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study examined the effects of controlled whole-body vibration training on reducing risk of slip-related falls in obese people. Twenty-three young adults with obesity were randomly assigned into either the vibration or placebo group. Both groups were also exposed to a standardized slip induced by a treadmill during gait prior to and following the training. Dynamic stability and fall incidences responding to the slip were also assessed. The results indicated that vibration training significantly increased the muscle strength and improved dynamic stability control at recovery touchdown after the slip occurrence. Vibration-based training could be a promising alternative or additional modality to active exercise-based fall prevention programs for people with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A hierarchical alarm model for elderly fall prevention sensors

17/05/2017

Source: Pervasive and Mobile Computing, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: New technologies allow for automatic monitoring of hospitalised older people, helping clinical staff to supervise to reduce falls. This paper introduces a hierarchical model to predict alarming states in a sensor worn over clothes. The hierarchy predicts levels of danger to warn clinical staff of possible fall danger.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to  find your local NHS Library.


Dopamine depletion in Parkinsons alters brain processing, impairing gait automaticity

18/04/2017

Source: NeuroImage, 2017, Vol 152 p. 207-220

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Impairments in motor automaticity cause patients with Parkinson’s disease to rely on attentional resources during gait, resulting in greater motor variability and a higher risk of falls. Although dopaminergic circuitry is known to play an important role in motor automaticity, little evidence exists on the neural mechanisms underlying the breakdown of locomotor automaticity in Parkinson’s disease. Overall, this study demonstrates that dopamine ameliorates gait automaticity in Parkinson’s disease by altering striatal, limbic and cerebellar processing, thereby informing future therapeutic avenues for gait and falls prevention.

Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Depressive symptomatology and fall risk among community-dwelling older adults

18/04/2017

Source: Social Science & Medicine, 2017, Vol 178 p. 206-213

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common among older adults and may be related to depressive symptoms (DS). With advancing age, there is an onset of chronic conditions, sensory impairments, and activity limitations that are associated with falls and with depressive disorders. Prior cross-sectional studies have observed significant associations between DS and subsequent falls as well as between fractures and subsequent clinical depression and DS. Using sophisticated methods and a large U.S. sample, this study found larger magnitudes of effect in the DS-falls relationship than in prior studies—highlighting the risk of falls for older adults with DS.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of obesity in recovering stability after a treadmill slip

21/02/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effects of obesity on falls and dynamic stability control in young adults subjected to a standardized treadmill-induced gait-slip. Trials were categorized as a fall or recovery based on the reliance of the subject on external support following the slip. Compared with the normal-weight group, the obese group demonstrated less relative muscle strength and fell more after the slip. Obese people’s dynamic stability after slip was impaired possibly due to the inability of controlling the trunk segment’s backward lean movement. Obesity therefore most likely influences ability to recover from slips. Interventions must be aimed at balance recovery among individuals with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


East Lancs Falls Response Service…keeping 900 patients out of hospital

19/12/2016

Source: The Academy of NHS Fabulous Stuff

Follow this link for the article

Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: Website news article

In a nutshell: Based at Burnley Ambulance Station in East Lancashire, an Occupational Therapist (Rachel Bedwell) and North West Ambulance Service paramedic (Gail Smith) respond to 999 and 111 calls triaged as ‘Green code – Falls with no apparent injury’.

The Falls Response Service – a one-of-a-kind in England – has attended 1,272 calls in the past 18 months and the intervention of a qualified OT has kept over 70% of patients in their own home rather than being transported to A&E.

Length of publication: 1 page


Preoperative Falls Predict Postoperative Falls, Functional Decline, and Surgical Complications

19/10/2016

Source: EBioMedicine, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common and linked to morbidity. This study’s objectives were to characterize postoperative falls, and determine whether preoperative falls independently predicted postoperative falls (primary outcome), functional dependence, quality of life, complications, and readmission. It concluded that falls are common after surgery, and preoperative falls herald postoperative falls and other adverse outcomes. A history of preoperative falls should be routinely ascertained.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Body mass index, falls, and injurious falls among U.S. adults

19/10/2016

Source: Preventive Medicine, 2016, Vol 91 p. 217-223

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are an important health concern because they are associated with loss of independence and disability, particularly among women. This study determined the age- and sex-specific prevalence of injurious falls among adults in the United States and examined the impact of obesity on fall risk. Not only are mid-life women at high risk for falls, but the class II/III obesity is a risk factor for injurious falls. Targeting mid-life women for fall and injury prevention is an important aim for practitioners, particularly given unique correlates of falling for this group.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Predictive Factors for Inpatient Falls among Children with Cerebral Palsy

19/10/2016

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Inpatient falls are of significant concern. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. A total of 93 patients with cerebral palsy were assessed based on a variety of tests. The study found that children with cerebral palsy may experience inpatient falls, but further studies are required in order to develop prevention programs. For patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy, these results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Predictive factors for inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy

19/10/2016

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This prospective study looked into the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. It found that behavioural problems (according to the mother’s statement), inability to maintain a long sitting position, ability to balance unsupported on knees, a history of frequent falls and a negative Thomas test were likely to increase the risk of falls. These results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission, though further studies are required to develop prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Community falls service produces ‘significant’ improvements in patients

15/09/2016

Source: The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, 2016, online

Follow this link for the article

Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Website news item

In a nutshell: A physiotherapist at a west London falls service has ‘significantly improved’ the health of patients, according to four commonly-used clinical outcome measures. The patients were discharged from April to June, and at the end of the programme people had improved their balance by nearly seven points on the Berg Balance Scale. Timed Up and Go, a simple and reliable test of a person’s risk of falls, showed an average improvement of nearly seven seconds across the group.

Length of publication: 1 page