Step length determines minimum toe clearance in older adults and people with Parkinson’s disease

18/01/2018

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: December 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Reduced foot clearance when walking may increase the risk of trips and falls in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Changes in foot clearance in PD are likely to be associated with temporal-spatial characteristics of gait such as walking slowly which evokes alterations in the temporal-spatial control of stepping patterns. Enhancing the understanding of the temporal-spatial determinants of foot clearance may inform the design of falls prevention therapies. Results suggest step length is the primary determinant of MTC regardless of pathology. Interventions that focus on increasing step length may help to reduce the risk of trips and falls during gait, however, clinical trials are required for robust evaluation.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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Implementation of the MEDFRAT to decrease falls in community hospital ERs

19/12/2017

Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article looked to identify and implement and evidence-based fall-risk assessment tool for use in emergency departments in rural areas. The Memorial Emergency Department Fall-Risk Assessment Tool (MEDFRAT) was programmed into the electronic medical record along with interventions that could be selected for two fall-risk levels. The model was found to be a useful framework in the process of implementing evidence-based changes in a rural population, though ongoing follow-ups will determine if the process results in fewer falls.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Does perturbation training prevent falls after discharge from stroke rehabilitation?

14/07/2017

Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebro-Vascular Diseases, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Individuals with stroke fall frequently, and no exercise intervention has been shown to prevent falls post stroke. Perturbation-based balance training (PBT), which involves practicing reactions to instability, shows promise for preventing falls in older adults and individuals with Parkinson’s disease. This study aimed to determine if PBT during inpatient stroke rehabilitation can prevent falls after discharge into the community. These findings suggest that PBT is promising for reducing falls post stroke. While this was not a randomized controlled trial, this study may provide sufficient evidence for implementing PBT in stroke rehabilitation practice.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Pilot Testing Fall TIPS (Tailoring Interventions for Patient Safety)

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient falls during an acute hospitalization cause injury, reduced mobility, and increased costs. The laminated paper Fall TIPS Toolkit (Fall TIPS) provides clinical decision support at the bedside by linking each patient’s fall risk assessment with evidence-based interventions. Strategies were needed to integrate this evidence into clinical practice.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Evaluation of falls sensor technology in acute care

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Sensor technology that dynamically identifies hospitalized patients’ fall risk and detects and alerts nurses of high-risk patients’ early exits out of bed has potential for reducing fall rates and preventing patient harm. In this study, a sensor was evaluated on two inpatient medical units to study fall characteristics and then to assign patient fall probability. A fall detection sensor system affords a level of surveillance that standard fall alert systems do not have. Fall prevention remains a complex issue, but sensor technology is a viable fall prevention option.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of vibration training in reducing risk of slip-related falls among young adults with obesity

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study examined the effects of controlled whole-body vibration training on reducing risk of slip-related falls in obese people. Twenty-three young adults with obesity were randomly assigned into either the vibration or placebo group. Both groups were also exposed to a standardized slip induced by a treadmill during gait prior to and following the training. Dynamic stability and fall incidences responding to the slip were also assessed. The results indicated that vibration training significantly increased the muscle strength and improved dynamic stability control at recovery touchdown after the slip occurrence. Vibration-based training could be a promising alternative or additional modality to active exercise-based fall prevention programs for people with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.