The effectiveness of intervention programs for preventing patients from falls

16/06/2017

Source: Kontakt, 2017, online

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This is a review article to summarise the conclusions of different studies about the effectiveness of hospital fall prevention programmes from the last five years. Twelve studies made it into the final review, and the most mentioned strategy was education of patients and staff. Effectiveness depends on factors like compliance, leadership, team training and IT support, amongst others.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Dance movement therapy and falls prevention

16/06/2017

Source: Maturitas, 2017, Vol 102 p. 1-5

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people which may improve various health outcomes in this population such as balance, gait and muscle performance. This study conducted a systematic review considering all RCTs investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. In two out of three RCTs, dancing improved this. However, there is a paucity of studies on dancing and falls, so the evidence is preliminary and equivocal.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this lik to find your local NHS Library.


Knowledge, behavioural practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: implications for prevention programs

16/06/2017

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2017, Vol 72 p. 19-24

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Date of publication: September-October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls prevention has been well-studied, but the focus is usually on indoor falls rather than outdoor. Older adults’ knowledge of outdoor risk factors and fall prevention practices have not been examined. This study sought to fill that gap and inform the development of a prevention program by exploring experiences of older adults.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Exergame technology and interactive interventions for elderly fall prevention

19/12/2016

Source: Applied Ergonomics, 2016, online

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Training balance and promoting physical activities in the elderly can contribute to fall-prevention. Due to the low adherence of conventional physical therapy, fall interventions through exergame technologies are emerging. This review study synthesized the available research on exergame technology and interactive interventions for fall prevention in the older population. The exergame intervention protocols and outcome measures for assessing intervention effectiveness varied, but the accumulated evidences revealed improved physical or cognitive functions. It remains inconclusive whether this intervention is superior to conventional physical therapy, and the effect mechanism of the exergaming on elderly’s balance ability is still unclear.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effectiveness of falls prevention programs for reducing diabetic risk factors

17/11/2016

Source: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, 2016, online

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Date of publication: October 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that increases falls risk in the elderly. Prevention programs with a component of weight-bearing exercises are effective in decreasing future falls. However, weight-bearing exercise was only recently recommended in guidelines for exercise for these patients. There have since been many studies evaluating the effectiveness of such programs on this population. Evidence suggests that people with T2DM and DPN can improve their balance and walking after a targeted multicomponent program, though it is yet unknown whether they resulted in a decreased falls risk in the community.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contract your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Risk factors for falls in people with lower limb amputation

15/08/2016

Source: PM&R, 2016, online

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Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This systematic review looked at the evidence connecting risk factors to falls in adults with a lower limb amputation. Risk factors include muscle weakness, increasing age, prescription medications and comorbidities. Risk factors specifically for amputees included reduced vibration sense. It found that falls are common from the time of amputation to years later in the community. Risk factors vary across care settings which has implications for safety and fall prevention strategies.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Cross-cultural validation of the falls efficacy scale international in elderly

21/04/2016

Source: Journal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2016, online

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to describe the psychometric properties of cultural adaptations of the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) in the elderly dwelling in the community. It used a systematic literature review to look into the question. The FES-I is considered acceptable, understandable to measure the fear of falling in the elderly, valid, reliable and comparable cross—culturally, so it is recommended in rehabilitation research, clinical trials and practice, and in fall-prevention programmes in the elderly.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


A novel approach to physical inactivity in older age

16/09/2015

Source: Preventive Medicine Reports, 2015, Volume 2 p. 595-597

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Date of publication: July 2015 (online)

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Well-designed exercise can prevent falls in older people but according to previous research, general physical activity may increase falls. This study evaluated uptake and adherence to a physical activity promotion and falls prevention intervention among older people in the community, aged over 60 years.

Length of publication: 3 pages


Falls prevention interventions in older adults with cognitive impairment

15/06/2015

Source: International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation

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Date of publication: June 4th 2015 volume 22 issue 6 pps. 289-296

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A critical review which explores the review of material on falls prevention interventions in older adults with cognitive impairment, such as dementia.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Pilates training on physical fitness and wellbeing in the elderly

17/04/2015

Source: Preventive Medicine, 2015, Vol 75 p. 1-11

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Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This systematic review aims to summarize the effects of Pilates exercise training (PET) in an elderly population on physical fitness, balance and fall prevention, and its effects on mood states, quality of life and independence in the daily living activities. PET should be taken into account as a way to improve quality of life in the elderly, due to the imparted benefits of fall prevention, physical fitness, and mood states.

Length of publication: 11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effect of Pilates exercise for improving balance in older adults

15/01/2015

Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2014, online

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Date of publication: December 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This systematic review investigated the effect of Pilates on balance and falls in older adults, and whether programmes tested in previous studies met best practice recommendations. The review notes a lack of high quality studies in this field, but the evidence available showed that Pilates can improve balance, which is a significant risk factor for falls in older adults. However, there is limited data on the impact of falls, and effects may have been overestimated due low quality of methodology in previous studies.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Exercise-based falls prevention programmes decrease fall-related injuries

12/11/2014

Source: Evidence Based Nursing, 2014, Vol 17 p. 125

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This is a commentary on a systematic review and meta-analysis. The article found that exercise programmes in older adults reduced falls while improving physical function, which in turn reduced the number of falls-related injuries. It recommends increasing the effectiveness of exercise-based fall-prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Can exercise prevent falls in older adults with sight impairments?

18/09/2014

Source: Journal of Physiotherapy, 2014, Vol 60 no 3 p. 130-135

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Date of publication: September 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Exercise and physical training in residential care settings can improve performance on some tests of physical function of older adults with visual impairments, which are risk factors for falls. However, the impact on falls themselves in as yet unclear and warrants further research. The same impact for community-based older adults with visual impairments also requires further research.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Association between orthostatic hypotension and cardiovascular risk, cerebrovascular risk, cognitive decline and falls as well as overall mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

15/08/2014

Source: Journal of Hypertension

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Date of publication: August 2014 32(8) pps. 1562-71

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A study to demonstrate how orthostatic hypotension may be an independent predictor of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular risk and all-cause mortality, particularly in a geriatric population.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.