Falls Prevention Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 3 Issue 4

15/04/2013

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Strategic targeted exercise for preventing falls in elderly people

15/04/2013

Source: The Journal of International Medical Research, 2013 (online first)

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This randomised, controlled and blinded trial compared conventional exercise with proprioception and cognitive exercise as well as conventional exercise. Elderly people were asked to exercise 3 times a week for 40 minutes per session, for 8 weeks. They were then assessed with a static postural control test with eyes open and closed. The targeted group was found to have statistically significant improvements compared to the control group, showing that targeted exercise could have more beneficial effects on balance and proprioception function than conventional exercise.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A concise reference for the most recent falls evidence

15/04/2013

Source: Medicine, 2013, 41(3), p. 155-159

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Given that falls in older people are so common and can be devastating and processing patients who present with falls can be challenging for non-specialists, this article has been prepared as a reference guide covering medical competencies on falls. The emphasis is on the acute setting, and covers important areas such as epidemiology of falls, definition and classification, and other such topics. It includes the latest developments in falls prevention research.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Heart rhythm in 90+ years old fallers

15/04/2013

Source: European Geriatric Medicine, 2013, 4(1) p. 5-7

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Event recordings were made in 111 90+ years old fallers, finding cases of atrial fibrillation. The incidence of atrial fibrillation increases with increasing age, which increases the risk of falls (as well as dementia and death). Therefore routine event recordings are important to reveal these arrythmias.

Length of publication: 3 Pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Correlation between fall prevention programmes and community fall rates

15/04/2013

Source: European Geriatric Medicine, 2013 (online)

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to examine the relationship between the number of participants using fall prevention-related programmes and community fall rates. It was conducted in Japan using community-dwelling older adults to identify areas with high fall rates, and then a survey was conducted to find information on fall prevention programmes. Those areas with lower fall rates had significantly more people enrolled in prevention programmes than those with higher fall rates.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Muscle weakness and the ability to prevent a fall

15/04/2013

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2013, 46 (1), p. 13-18

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effect of age-related loss of strength on the ability on the ability to restore static balance following a recovery step from a backward balance loss. It suggests training of the stepping response could be more effective than strength training in preventing backward falls.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.