Falls Prevention Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 3 Issue 4

15/04/2013

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Strategic targeted exercise for preventing falls in elderly people

15/04/2013

Source: The Journal of International Medical Research, 2013 (online first)

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This randomised, controlled and blinded trial compared conventional exercise with proprioception and cognitive exercise as well as conventional exercise. Elderly people were asked to exercise 3 times a week for 40 minutes per session, for 8 weeks. They were then assessed with a static postural control test with eyes open and closed. The targeted group was found to have statistically significant improvements compared to the control group, showing that targeted exercise could have more beneficial effects on balance and proprioception function than conventional exercise.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A concise reference for the most recent falls evidence

15/04/2013

Source: Medicine, 2013, 41(3), p. 155-159

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Given that falls in older people are so common and can be devastating and processing patients who present with falls can be challenging for non-specialists, this article has been prepared as a reference guide covering medical competencies on falls. The emphasis is on the acute setting, and covers important areas such as epidemiology of falls, definition and classification, and other such topics. It includes the latest developments in falls prevention research.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Heart rhythm in 90+ years old fallers

15/04/2013

Source: European Geriatric Medicine, 2013, 4(1) p. 5-7

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Event recordings were made in 111 90+ years old fallers, finding cases of atrial fibrillation. The incidence of atrial fibrillation increases with increasing age, which increases the risk of falls (as well as dementia and death). Therefore routine event recordings are important to reveal these arrythmias.

Length of publication: 3 Pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Correlation between fall prevention programmes and community fall rates

15/04/2013

Source: European Geriatric Medicine, 2013 (online)

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to examine the relationship between the number of participants using fall prevention-related programmes and community fall rates. It was conducted in Japan using community-dwelling older adults to identify areas with high fall rates, and then a survey was conducted to find information on fall prevention programmes. Those areas with lower fall rates had significantly more people enrolled in prevention programmes than those with higher fall rates.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Muscle weakness and the ability to prevent a fall

15/04/2013

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2013, 46 (1), p. 13-18

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effect of age-related loss of strength on the ability on the ability to restore static balance following a recovery step from a backward balance loss. It suggests training of the stepping response could be more effective than strength training in preventing backward falls.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


An aquatic training programme including perturbation exercises improves voluntary stepping

15/04/2013

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2013, 56 (1), p. 134-140

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January-February 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effects of a water exercise training programme that includes perturbation exercises to improve the speed of voluntary stepping reaction in older adults. The speed of voluntary stepping is considered an important skill to prevent a fall when balance is lost. An improvement in step initiation and swing was noted each time a group underwent the training programme. This could also be used to better control balance in upright standing.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact you local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Health and lifestyle risk factors for falls in Australia

15/04/2013

Source: Journal of Safety Research, 2013, 45, p. 7-13

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A sample of people aged 65 and over in the community in New South Wales, Australia were surveyed regarding their falls experiences, lifestyles and general health to identify medical, health and lifestyle factors associated with falls and multiple falls. People who fell were more likely to be over 85 and have various health problems and be overweight than non-fallers. The survey reinforces the multifactorial nature of falls and the complex interaction of risk factors that increase the chance of individuals having a fall.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Multiple sclerosis sufferers use many strategies but still fall frequently

15/04/2013

Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2013 (online)

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study compared the use of fall prevention strategies by people with multiple sclerosis who do or don’t fall. It found that a higher proportion of fallers than non-fallers used strategies such as turning on lights at home, asking for help and talking to a healthcare professional about preventing falls. However, both groups rarely used this latter category or enquired about which medications might increase fall risk.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Determining elderly people at high risk of falling in Japan

15/04/2013

Source: International Journal of Gerontology, 2013, 7 (1), p. 13-16

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to determine useful risk factors that can be used to screen for the elderly at high risk of falling. Demura at el’s fall-risk assessment scale consists of previous fall experience and 50 other fall-risk assessment items related to the potential for falling, physical function, disease and other such factors. The results suggest that the potential for falling is a useful risk factor when screening the elderly.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Comparative effectiveness of implementing best practices in nursing homes

15/04/2013

Source: International Journal of Nursing Studies, 2013, 50 (4), p. 448-463

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: April 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This American study aimed to conduct comparative research to estimate the effects of falls, negative affect and behaviour, and how these associate with societal costs in implementing evidence-based education and best practice programmes in nursing homes. The participants were given either standard training, training and implementation modules (provided to facility staff), and training and implementation modules (augmented by surveyor training). A significant reduction of 5-12 annual falls was found, especially in the intervention group without surveyor training, which also produced cost savings.

Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Further dissemination

15/04/2013

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