Falls Prevention Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 3 Issue 7

19/07/2013
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NICE guideline update: older people at risk of hospital falls

19/07/2013

Source: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence website

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Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Website news item

In a nutshell: New NICE guidelines published last month state that health professionals should consider patients over 65, or those over 50 with certain conditions such as strokes, as being high risk for falling while in hospital. Falls cost the NHS around £2.3 billion per year, and may cause death, serious injury such as fractures or head injuries, and minor cuts and bruises. The guidance calls for clinicians to assess risks of falling and consider multifactorial interventions.

Length of publication: 1 page


The ‘Ossébo’ intervention for the prevention of womens’ injurious falls

19/07/2013

Source: Global Health Promotion, 2013, 20 (2) Supplement p. 88-93

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Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell:Falls and related injuries can be reduced by exercise, amongst other things, but the effect of exercise on serious falls injuries is unclear. This randomised controlled trial, ‘Ossébo’, aims to assess the effect of a community-based group exercise programme on the prevention of falls in women aged 75-85. The study will help to determine the effectiveness of a large scale fall prevention programme and the factors that may contribute to its success.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Referral by prehospital emergency services to a community-based falls-prevention service

19/07/2013

Source: Injury Prevention, 2013, 19 (2) p. 134-138

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Date of publication: April 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Identifying people at risk of a serious fall before they require hospital treatment allows early intervention as well as a possible reduction in further falls and healthcare costs. This Australian project aimed to set up a referral pathway for older people to contact a community falls-prevention team. An education package, referral pathway and follow-up procedures were developed and outcome measures collected to compare people put onto the different pathways. However, even though the project had support from various levels of management, it did not result in any referrals to the pathway. Possible reasons for this are explained.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A comparison of ICECAP-O and EQ-5D in a falls clinic

19/07/2013

Source: Quality of Life Research, 2013, 22 (5) p. 969-977

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Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This research explored two preference-based outcome measures, to investigate whether they were complementary or if one would work better than the other. The measures were tested on over 200 seniors in a falls prevention clinic in Vancouver, and few discrepancies were details between them. The study concluded that the measures can be used conjunction with each other, as they provide complementary information.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Myofascial trigger point and falls in the elderly

19/07/2013

Source: Medical Hypotheses, 2013, 80 (6) p. 806-809

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Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article compares arthrogenous muscle inhibition, which causes quadriceps muscle weakness and leads to falls, with myofascial trigger point, causing muscle tightness, pain and weakness to detect knee instability, and therefore falls, in the elderly. MTrP is more sensitive in detecting impairment and changes in neuromuscular set up, and can allow early detection and prevention of falls in the elderly.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact you local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Managing fear of falling in older adults in the community

19/07/2013

Source: BMJ, 2013, 346

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Date of publication: May 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Fear of falling is found in many older people, and can include fear, anxiety, loss of confidence and impaired perception of ability to walk without falling. It can lead to avoidance of activity, isolation, increasing frailty and further risk of falls not due to physical impairment. This article looks into the ways of managing the fear of falling by researching the available evidence.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Prevention of patient falls: a case study

19/07/2013

Source: Apollo Medicine, 2013, 10 (2) p. 175-180

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Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: According to research, the majority (78%) of falls in hospital are anticipated, and very few are unanticipated (8%) or accidental (14%). Guidelines to prevent falls have helped to reduce the numbers and increase patient safety.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Using gait stability measures to estimate fall risk

19/07/2013

Source: Gait and Posture, 28 May 2013

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: May 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls in older adults often occur during walking, due to balance being affected by variations in gait. Analysis of trunk kinematics during gait could provide a quantitative assessment of fall risk. This study investigated the association between this and fall history, using a sample of people aged 50 and over. The study found positive associations between its methods of assessment and falls history which could be useful tools to identify subjects for falls prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Further dissemination

19/07/2013

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