The influence of older adults’ beliefs and attitudes on adopting fall prevention behaviors

21/02/2017

Source: American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine 

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 17th January 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Among Americans aged 65 years and older, falls are the leading cause of injury death and disability, and finding effective methods to prevent older adult falls has become a public health priority. While research has identified effective interventions delivered in community and clinical settings, persuading older adults to adopt these interventions has been challenging. Older adults often do not acknowledge or recognize their fall risk. Many see falls as an inevitable consequence of aging. Health care providers can play an important role by identifying older adults who are likely to fall and providing clinical interventions to help reduce fall risks. Many older people respect the information and advice they receive from their providers. Health care practitioners can encourage patients to adopt effective fall prevention strategies by helping them understand and acknowledge their fall risk while emphasizing the positive benefits of fall prevention such as remaining independent. To help clinicians integrate fall prevention into their practice, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched the STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries) initiative. It provides health care providers in primary care settings with resources to help them screen older adult patients, assess their fall risk, and provide effective interventions.

 Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Bedside vision check for falls prevention: assessment tool

21/02/2017

Source: Royal College of Physicians 

Follow this link for the full text 

Date of publication: 23rd January 2017

 Publication type: Guideline

In a nutshell: The National Audit of Inpatient Falls (NAIF) has collaborated with partners to produce a new vision assessment tool which enables ward staff to quickly assess a patient’s eyesight in order to help prevent them falling or tripping while in hospital.

 Length of publication: One page

 


Advancing community-based falls prevention programs for older adults—the work of the administration for community living/administration on aging

21/02/2017

Source:  Frontiers in Public Health 

Follow this link for the full text

Date of publication: 3rd February 2017

 Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: The mission of the Administration for Community Living (ACL) is to maximize the independence, well-being, and health of older adults, people with disabilities across the lifespan, and their families and caregivers. In direct alignment with this mission is ACL’s support of evidence-based falls prevention programs in communities throughout the United States. Since 2014, the Administration on Aging (AoA), part of ACL, has invested nearly $14 million in entities such as state agencies, nonprofits, and universities to expand access to proven community-based falls prevention programs. The initiatives supported by ACL/AoA bring to bear two primary goals—(1) to significantly increase the number of older adults and older adults with disabilities at risk for falls who participate in evidence-based community programs to reduce falls and falls risks; and (2) to implement innovative funding arrangements, including contracts, partnerships, and collaborations with one or more sustainability partners to support these programs during and beyond the grant period. Support from ACL/AoA has significantly increased the availability of evidence-based falls prevention programs in funded communities, as well as enhanced the network’s sustainable delivery infrastructure to promote continued access to these critical programs beyond the scope of grant funding. This article highlights the successful rollout of ACL/AoA’s falls prevention initiative.

 Length of publication: One page

 

 


Effects of obesity in recovering stability after a treadmill slip

21/02/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effects of obesity on falls and dynamic stability control in young adults subjected to a standardized treadmill-induced gait-slip. Trials were categorized as a fall or recovery based on the reliance of the subject on external support following the slip. Compared with the normal-weight group, the obese group demonstrated less relative muscle strength and fell more after the slip. Obese people’s dynamic stability after slip was impaired possibly due to the inability of controlling the trunk segment’s backward lean movement. Obesity therefore most likely influences ability to recover from slips. Interventions must be aimed at balance recovery among individuals with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Spinal mobility and alignment leading to lower QoL and falling

21/02/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017, Volume 53 p. 98-103

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Spinal deformities can affect quality of life (QOL) and risk of falling, but no studies have explored the relationships of spinal mobility and sagittal alignment of spine and the lower extremities simultaneously. Purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship of those postural parameters to QOL and risk of falling. Forward-stooped posture and knee-flexion deformity could be important indicator of lower QOL. Moreover, limited extension in the lumbar spine could be a useful screening examination for fall prevention in the elderly.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Further dissemination

21/02/2017

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