Reducing falls can help trusts improve patient experience and reduce costs

17/08/2017

Source: NHS Improvement, 2017

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: This report from NHS Improvement provides a picture of the scale of inpatient falls and the benefits to the NHS if the rate in hospitals was reduced. It followed the successful completion of their collaboration between 19 trusts to adopt improvement methodologies and creating a learning community to discuss changes. Results include the observation that older patients represent 77% of total falls, but 87% of total costs – reducing this group by around 25-30% could result in annual savings of up to £170m.

Length of publication: 1 page


Mid Yorks NHS Trust adopts physio-designed training to prevent falls

17/08/2017

Source: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, 2017, online

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News article

In a nutshell: Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust has launched falls prevention training for staff which recreates real-life situations in allocated sections of actual wards and clinics.

Length of publication: 1 page


Pilot Testing Fall TIPS (Tailoring Interventions for Patient Safety)

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient falls during an acute hospitalization cause injury, reduced mobility, and increased costs. The laminated paper Fall TIPS Toolkit (Fall TIPS) provides clinical decision support at the bedside by linking each patient’s fall risk assessment with evidence-based interventions. Strategies were needed to integrate this evidence into clinical practice.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Evaluation of falls sensor technology in acute care

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Sensor technology that dynamically identifies hospitalized patients’ fall risk and detects and alerts nurses of high-risk patients’ early exits out of bed has potential for reducing fall rates and preventing patient harm. In this study, a sensor was evaluated on two inpatient medical units to study fall characteristics and then to assign patient fall probability. A fall detection sensor system affords a level of surveillance that standard fall alert systems do not have. Fall prevention remains a complex issue, but sensor technology is a viable fall prevention option.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A hierarchical alarm model for elderly fall prevention sensors

17/05/2017

Source: Pervasive and Mobile Computing, 2017, online

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: New technologies allow for automatic monitoring of hospitalised older people, helping clinical staff to supervise to reduce falls. This paper introduces a hierarchical model to predict alarming states in a sensor worn over clothes. The hierarchy predicts levels of danger to warn clinical staff of possible fall danger.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to  find your local NHS Library.


Preoperative Falls Predict Postoperative Falls, Functional Decline, and Surgical Complications

19/10/2016

Source: EBioMedicine, 2016, online

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common and linked to morbidity. This study’s objectives were to characterize postoperative falls, and determine whether preoperative falls independently predicted postoperative falls (primary outcome), functional dependence, quality of life, complications, and readmission. It concluded that falls are common after surgery, and preoperative falls herald postoperative falls and other adverse outcomes. A history of preoperative falls should be routinely ascertained.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Predictive Factors for Inpatient Falls among Children with Cerebral Palsy

19/10/2016

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2016, online

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Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Inpatient falls are of significant concern. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. A total of 93 patients with cerebral palsy were assessed based on a variety of tests. The study found that children with cerebral palsy may experience inpatient falls, but further studies are required in order to develop prevention programs. For patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy, these results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Predictive factors for inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy

19/10/2016

Source: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2016, online

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Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This prospective study looked into the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. It found that behavioural problems (according to the mother’s statement), inability to maintain a long sitting position, ability to balance unsupported on knees, a history of frequent falls and a negative Thomas test were likely to increase the risk of falls. These results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission, though further studies are required to develop prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The Nicklaus Children’s Hospital Humpty Dumpty Falls Prevention Program™

21/06/2016

Source: Nurse Leader, 2016, Vol 14 no 3 p. 212-218

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Date of publication: June 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Nicklaus Children’s Hospital is in South Florida and is a licensed speciality hospital exclusively for children, with a mission to safeguard hospitalized children by keeping them safe from harm. The organization has gained international attention for its seminal work in preventing falls in the paediatric population, integrating the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Magnet® Model and exemplary professional practice. The Humpty Dumpty Falls Prevention Program™ is an innovative, evidence-based tool that has become a standard of safe paediatric care, decreasing paediatric patient falls while evolving into a standard of care around the globe.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link fto find your local NHS Library.


Redevelopment of a new patient-centred fall prevention toolkit

23/05/2016

Source: Applied Ergonomics, 2016, Vol 56 p. 117-126

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Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: An electronic decision support known as Fall TIPS (Tailoring Interventions for Patient Safety) has proven effective in decreasing hospital falls. A paper version was developed for those hospitals without the resources to implement the electronic version, though more work is needed to optimise the effectiveness of the paper version of the tool. This study looks back at the design, which included input from patients and clinical staff to increase its adoption as well as fall prevention best pracices. The redesigned paper toolkit included a clnical decision support system and increased ease of use compared to the original.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find yor local NHS Library.


Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients

21/04/2016

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2016, online

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient falls within hospitals are mainly preventable, but are a serious source of incidents among older patients. This study seeks to identify possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls, which is lacking in literature, such as patient motions, environmental design factors in bathrooms, and clinician zones in a patient’s room. Results suggest that only motion-related factors contribute significantly to falls in the bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute in the clinician zone. Future work includes updating environmental design factors associated with these motions in a patient’s room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Patient perceptions with falls during hospitalization and after discharge

14/03/2016

Source: Applied Nursing Research, 2016, Vol 31 p. 79-85

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aims to describe the perceptions of hospitalised older people around their falls risk and fall prevention strategies received while hospitalised, and any instructions they received to prevent possible falls after discharge.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Fall risk assessment: retrospective analysis of Morse Fall Scale scores

14/03/2016

Source: Applied Nursing Research, 2016, Vol 31 p. 34-40

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The Morse Fall Scale is used in several care settings for fall risk assessment and supports the implementation of preventive nursing interventions. This study aims to analyse its scores to compare patient characteristics, diagnoses and lengths of stay, looking at elderly female patients in Portugal. There were no statistical differences in Morse Fall Scale score between the first and the last assessment.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Unintentional injuries treated in emergency departments among older people

16/12/2015

Source: Journal of Safety Research, 2015, online

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Date of publication: December 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: In the USA, unintentional injuries among older adults, and especially falls-related injuries, are an increasing public health concern. In 2011, 65% of these injuries were due to falls, which increased with age and peaked at the ≥ 100 age group. Prevention efforts to reduce falls and resulting injuries among adults aged ≥ 65 years have the potential to increase well-being and reduce health care spending. Increasing knowledge about fall risk factors and broadly disseminating evidence-based injury and fall prevention programs in both clinical and community settings must be priorities.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full ext of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.