Building interprofessional teams through evidence based practice training in falls prevention

17/11/2015

Source: Age in Action 

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Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell:  An examination of the implementation of a 24-content hour EBP program on reducing falls at two different sites having different organizational and staffing patterns in order to determine important contributors to and barriers against practice changes in interprofessional teaming.

Length of publication: 7 pages

 

 

 

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The use of ICT for falls prevention, detection and monitoring- call for case studies

16/09/2015

Source: Prevention of Falls Network Earth

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Date of publication: July 2015

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: ProFouND, the EC-funded initiative dedicated to bringing about the dissemination and implementation of best practice in falls prevention across Europe, is looking for case studies from across the UK on peoples’ experiences of using information and ICT-based technologies for falls prediction, detection and prevention in practice. They want to know about technologies used and who they are manufactured by. These can include call alarm systems, bed alarms and even Wii or Kinect games systems – how have patients/older people got on with using the technology?

Length of publication: 1 page


Geospatial distribution of fall-related hospitalisation incidence in Texas

19/03/2015

Source: Journal of Safety Research, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study examined incidence and characteristics of fall-related hospitalisations among Texans aged 50 or older by geography and across time, to try and identify fall hot-spots which might lack fall prevention programmes. The study concluded that increased efforts are needed to identify older adults at elevated risk of falling, and that referral systems need to take geographical settings into account. This can in turn inform strategic planning efforts to develop clinical-community partnerships to offer fall-prevention programmes in high-risk areas.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Fatty degeneration of gluteus minimus muscle as predictor of falls

18/09/2014

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 1 August 2014, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The degeneration of fatty tissue in the gluteus minimus tends to be unevenly distributed, unlike that of the gluteus maximus, and researchers believe that this may play a crucial role in stability of the pelvis. Evaluating fatty streaks in this muscle could help give an early indication of those at higher risk of falling.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The importance of minimum toe clearance in level ground walking

18/09/2014

Source: Gait and Posture, 28 July 2014, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Tripping is supposed to be the main cause of falls while walking. At minimum toe clearance, the potential for falls is the highest, so controlling this minimum clearance is essential for walking without tripping. This study aimed to determine if elderly people showed lower minimum toe clearance while doing more than one task at once.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Stress increases chances of falling

24/09/2013

Source: Age and ageing, 2013 (online)

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: September 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This prospective study investigated the association between major life events/sudden emotion stress and fall and fracture risk. It found that stressful life events were associated with falls, especially multiple falls, even adjusting for age, diseases, past falls, depression and other such risk factors. Risk of falling increased with the number of types of stressful life events. The study concluded that stressful life events significantly increased the risk of falls independent of other risks, but did not independently increase risk of fractures.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.