Discussion of fall prevention approaches with older adult patients

05/03/2018

Source: Preventive Medicine Reports, 2018, Vol 9 p. 149-152

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries among older adults. The American and British Geriatric Societies recommend a fall risk assessment to identify risk factors and guide interventions to prevent these falls. This study describes the self-reported discussion of fall prevention approaches used by primary care providers (PCPs) who treat older adults. Self-reported discussion of any fall prevention approaches was 89.3%. Controlling for provider and practice characteristics, there were significant differences by provider type. Fall prevention suggestions vary by type of PCP. Dissemination of geriatric guidelines should include all PCPs who routinely see older adults.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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Community peer-led falls prevention presentations: what do the experts suggest?

05/03/2018

Source: The Journal of Primary Prevention 

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 10 January 2018

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looks a peer-led falls prevention education for older adults to determine if it  may have potential for bridging the research evidence-practice gap, thereby promoting the uptake of falls prevention strategies.

 Length of publication: 18 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Implementation of the MEDFRAT to decrease falls in community hospital ERs

19/12/2017

Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article looked to identify and implement and evidence-based fall-risk assessment tool for use in emergency departments in rural areas. The Memorial Emergency Department Fall-Risk Assessment Tool (MEDFRAT) was programmed into the electronic medical record along with interventions that could be selected for two fall-risk levels. The model was found to be a useful framework in the process of implementing evidence-based changes in a rural population, though ongoing follow-ups will determine if the process results in fewer falls.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Self-powered fall detection system using pressure sensing triboelectric nanogenerators

17/10/2017

Source: Nano Energy, 2017, Vol. 41 p. 139-147

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Fall detection is becoming more important as the number of older people in society increases. People may fall at home where there is little timely help available, and falls themselves can cause injuries. Most fall detection technologies are inconvenient to wear, and visual or movement-based ones can be expensive and difficult to install. This study proposes a falls-detection system based on a pressure-sensing triboelectric nanogenerator array, which is cost-effective and ambient-based. It achieves a classification accuracy of 95.75% in identifying actual falls, and can be immediately installed due to low costs.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Strategies to prevent falls and injuries among older adults

15/09/2017

Source: Nursing Clinics of North America, 2017, Volume 52 no 3 p. 489-497

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls in older adults are the leading cause of injuries, and community-dwelling older adults should have an annual fall risk screening/assessment. This article looks at both clinical and community-based strategies from several different evidence-based programs to raise awareness in older adults in the community about falls, about increasing strength and balance, and to address the fear of falling.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Does perturbation training prevent falls after discharge from stroke rehabilitation?

14/07/2017

Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebro-Vascular Diseases, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Individuals with stroke fall frequently, and no exercise intervention has been shown to prevent falls post stroke. Perturbation-based balance training (PBT), which involves practicing reactions to instability, shows promise for preventing falls in older adults and individuals with Parkinson’s disease. This study aimed to determine if PBT during inpatient stroke rehabilitation can prevent falls after discharge into the community. These findings suggest that PBT is promising for reducing falls post stroke. While this was not a randomized controlled trial, this study may provide sufficient evidence for implementing PBT in stroke rehabilitation practice.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Knowledge, behavioural practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: implications for prevention programs

16/06/2017

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2017, Vol 72 p. 19-24

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September-October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls prevention has been well-studied, but the focus is usually on indoor falls rather than outdoor. Older adults’ knowledge of outdoor risk factors and fall prevention practices have not been examined. This study sought to fill that gap and inform the development of a prevention program by exploring experiences of older adults.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Home and community based occupational therapy improves functioning in frail older people: a systematic review

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of the American geriatrics Society

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 3rd April 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of occupational therapy to improve performance in daily living activities in community-dwelling physically frail older people.

 Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Parkinsonian signs are a risk factor for falls

17/05/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017 p. 1-5

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This cohort study looked at how likely people with Parkinson’s disease were to fall compared to those without, as Parkinsonian symptoms are common in older adults and are associated with increased rates of dementia and mortality. Even adjusting for age, cognitive function and co-morbidities, those with signs were still 38% more likely to fall than those without, and those falls were also more likely to lead to injury. Parkinsonian signs are a significant and independent risk factor for falls, and early detection is essential to implement fall prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Comparison of factors between elderly fall groups receiving home care

18/01/2017

Source: Asian Nursing Research, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: December 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The purpose of this study was to provide information to develop a program to prevent repeated falls by analyzing the difference in gait, muscle strength, balance, and fear of falling according to their fall experience. The study suggests that intervention program should be tailored to fall risk factors to enhance gait and balance and lower body muscle strength and reduce the fear of falling to prevent repeated incidences of falls in this population.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


East Lancs Falls Response Service…keeping 900 patients out of hospital

19/12/2016

Source: The Academy of NHS Fabulous Stuff

Follow this link for the article

Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: Website news article

In a nutshell: Based at Burnley Ambulance Station in East Lancashire, an Occupational Therapist (Rachel Bedwell) and North West Ambulance Service paramedic (Gail Smith) respond to 999 and 111 calls triaged as ‘Green code – Falls with no apparent injury’.

The Falls Response Service – a one-of-a-kind in England – has attended 1,272 calls in the past 18 months and the intervention of a qualified OT has kept over 70% of patients in their own home rather than being transported to A&E.

Length of publication: 1 page


The degree of misjudgment between perceived and actual gait ability

19/12/2016

Source: Gait & posture, 2017, Vol 51 p. 275-280

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Carrying out motor tasks successfully means a person’s perception of their physical abilities must be integrated with a perception of the task itself. Geriatric decline in physical and cognitive abilities may lead to misjudgements and possibly errors leading to loss of balance. This study aimed to quantify how much older adults misjudge their actual gait ability. Better abilities did not appear to be associated with better judgement – in fact, a range of misjudgements showed. This could provide insight into the interplay between cognition and physical abilities, and add value towards fall prevention and promotion of healthy ageing.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Evidence of compensatory joint kinetics on stairs in Parkinson’s disease

19/12/2016

Source: Gait and Posture, 2017, Vol 52 p. 33-39

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of pulication: February 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Using stairs requires larger joint movements than simply walking and preventing lower limb collapse depends on large enough movement in the hip, knee and ankle. However, people with Parkinson’s disease often can’t control their lower limbs which can increase fall risk. They also rely more heavily on knee extensor muscles which can provide them with an increased sense of stability.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.