Does baseline depression increase the risk of unexplained and accidental falls in a cohort of community-dwelling older people? Data from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA)

15/09/2017

Source: Geriatric Psychiatry 

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 4th August 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This longitudinal study examines the relationship between baseline depression and subsequent falls, both accidental and unexplained, at 2year followup in a cohort of community dwelling adults aged 50 years.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

 

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Depressive symptoms and adverse outcomes from hospitalization in older adults: secondary outcomes of a trial of falls prevention education

17/04/2015

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January -February 2015 vol. 60 iss. 1 pps. 96-102

Publication type: journal article

In a nutshell: A study that attempts to describe the magnitude of depressive symptoms, shift of depressive symptoms and the impact of the symptoms of depression among older hospital patients during hospital admission and identify whether exposure to falls prevention education affected symptoms of depression.

Length of publication: six pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

 


Depression and fear of falling in a falls prevention programme

19/03/2015

Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looked into whether depression predicted less improvement in fear of falling and falls efficacy in older adults attending a fall prevention programme it found that there was no association between depression and change in fear of falling, but there was a correlation between improvement in depressive symptoms and improvement in falls efficacy, which raises the question of whether a cognitive behavioural intervention that simultaneously targets both depression and falls efficacy would be a useful component of a FPP.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Depressive symptoms and adverse outcomes from hospitalization in older adults: secondary outcomes of a trial of falls prevention education

16/10/2014

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatircs

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 25th 2014 – article in press

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell:This study aims to describe the magnitude of depressive symptoms, shift of depressive symptoms and the impact of the symptoms of depression amongst older hospital patients during hospital admission and identify whether exposure to falls prevention education affected symptoms of depression

Length of publication: unknown

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The relationship among falls, rehabilitation outcomes and health services use

13/12/2013

Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2013, Vol 14 no 11 p. 832-836

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Date of publication: November 2013

Publication Type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looked at determining the characteristics associated with single and multiple fallers in a post-acute rehabilitation centre. It found that the majority of fallers were older males who were frail and suffered cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms. Multiple fallers were particularly at risk of poor functional recovery and increased health service use. Specific programs targeting these patients should be developed in further studies.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact you local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Associated factors for falls in Taiwanese men in Veterans homes

17/06/2013

Source: International Journal of Gerontology, 2013, 7(2) p. 80-84

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Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This cross-sectional study investigated the prevalence and frequency of falls and identified the associated factors of falls among aged Taiwanese men. It showed that there are several independent variables for predicting falls including advanced age, stroke and depression status. Depression is the only factor capable of predicting recurrent falls.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Depressive symptoms may predict falls in older Taiwanese people

14/12/2012

Source: Age and Ageing, 2012, 41(5) p. 606-612

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: September 2012

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated depressive symptoms in older, community-dwelling adults in Taiwan, to see if they had any effect on the prevalence of falls. The participants were tested for their sensorimotor, balance and mobility and then followed up over two years. Depressive symptoms were common in older people, and were associated with an increased risk of falls. Findings suggest that falls prevention strategies should include interventions for depression along with those for strength, balance and maximising vision.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of this article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Can depression predict falls in older people?

18/10/2012

Source: Age and Ageing, 2012, 41 (5) p. 606-612

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: September 2012

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated whether depression can predict falls in community-dwelling older people in Taiwan, in addition to problems with vision, strength and balance. Depressive symptoms were found to be significantly more prevalent in those who experienced one or more falls compared to those who didn’t fall. The findings suggest that interventions to treat depression should be built into falls prevention strategies.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.