Reducing falls can help trusts improve patient experience and reduce costs

17/08/2017

Source: NHS Improvement, 2017

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: This report from NHS Improvement provides a picture of the scale of inpatient falls and the benefits to the NHS if the rate in hospitals was reduced. It followed the successful completion of their collaboration between 19 trusts to adopt improvement methodologies and creating a learning community to discuss changes. Results include the observation that older patients represent 77% of total falls, but 87% of total costs – reducing this group by around 25-30% could result in annual savings of up to £170m.

Length of publication: 1 page

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Development and delivery of an exercise programme for falls prevention

17/08/2017

Source: Physiotherapy, 2017, online

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This paper describes the development and implementation of an exercise intervention to prevent falls within The Prevention of Fall Injury Trial (PreFIT), which is a large multi-centred randomised controlled trial based in the UK National Health Service (NHS). The exercise programme targets lower limb strength and balance, which are known, modifiable risk factors for falling.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The evolution of a community-wide interprofessional fall prevention partnership

17/07/2017

Source: Journal of Interprofessional Education and Practice, 2017, Vol 8 p. 47-51

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Date of publication: September 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Despite a focus on interprofessional (IP) approaches to healthcare, many providers, researchers and community programs continue to operate in silos. This is not only inefficient and costly, but also inconducive to knowledge translation. This study aimed to describe how fall prevention was the vehicle for developing a focused community-wide interprofessional partnership. The framework presented may be helpful to other communities/programs focused on developing interprofessional approaches to evidence-based chronic condition management.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Knowledge, behavioural practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: implications for prevention programs

16/06/2017

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2017, Vol 72 p. 19-24

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Date of publication: September-October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls prevention has been well-studied, but the focus is usually on indoor falls rather than outdoor. Older adults’ knowledge of outdoor risk factors and fall prevention practices have not been examined. This study sought to fill that gap and inform the development of a prevention program by exploring experiences of older adults.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Long-term effectiveness of a multifactorial program in Bavarian nursing homes

16/06/2017

Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2017, Vol 18, no 6, p. 552.e7-552.e17

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Femoral fractures are frequently consequences of falls in nursing homes and are associated with considerable costs and unfavorable outcomes such as immobility and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effectiveness of a multifactorial fall and fracture prevention program in nursing homes in terms of reducing femoral fractures.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Parkinsonian signs are a risk factor for falls

17/05/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017 p. 1-5

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This cohort study looked at how likely people with Parkinson’s disease were to fall compared to those without, as Parkinsonian symptoms are common in older adults and are associated with increased rates of dementia and mortality. Even adjusting for age, cognitive function and co-morbidities, those with signs were still 38% more likely to fall than those without, and those falls were also more likely to lead to injury. Parkinsonian signs are a significant and independent risk factor for falls, and early detection is essential to implement fall prevention programmes.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.