STEADI: CDC’s approach to make older adult fall prevention part of every primary care practice

17/10/2017

Source: Journal of Safety Research 

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 4th September 2017

Publication type: Journal article 

In a nutshell:  This article looks at an initiative developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed the STEADI to give health care providers the tools they need to help reduce their older adult patient’s risk of a fall.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

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Fall risk, supports and services, and falls following a nursing home discharge

17/10/2017

Source: The Gerontologist

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Date of publication: 4th September 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study examines whether the presence of supports and services impacts the relationship between fall-related risk factors and fall occurrence post NH discharge.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Quick adjustments during gait are less accurate through focal cerebellar lesions

17/10/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017, Volume 58 p. 390-393

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Online gait corrections are frequently used to restore gait stability and prevent falling. They require shorter response times than voluntary movements which suggests that subcortical pathways contribute to the execution of online gait corrections. To evaluate the cerebellum in these pathways two hypotheses were tested around accuracy of online gait corrections and the pronouncement of differences. The reduced ability to accurately adjust foot placement during walking in individuals with focal cerebellar lesions appears to be a general movement control deficit, which could contribute to increased fall risk.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Conceptualizing a dynamic fall risk model including intrinsic risks and exposures

17/10/2017

Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2017, Online

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Date of publication: September 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are a major cause of injury and disability in older people, and can lead to various health and social consequences. Accurately understanding and identifying a person’s fall risk is needed to design and provide individual prevention measures, but current fall-risk models are weak compared to risk models for other specialities. Current models, for example, consider risk factors to be stable over time, not reflecting real-life experience. This study therefore posits a dynamic fall-risk model linking time and context. This may lead to the development of new fall prevention interventions.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Balance and fall risk assessments with mobile phone technology

15/09/2017

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2017, online

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: While falls are a major health concern for older adults, preventative measures can help to reduce their incidence and severity; methods for assessing balance and fall risk factors are necessary to implement preventative measures. Mobile applications are being developed to enable seniors, caregivers and clinicians to monitor risks. This systematic review assesses reviews of such apps for their accuracy, reliability and validity. Further research is needed.

Length of publication: 16 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Accelerometer-measured moderate to vigorous physical activity and incidence rates of falls in older women

15/09/2017

Source: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 

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Date of publication: 29 July 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: To examine whether moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) measured using accelerometry is associated with incident falls and whether associations differ according to physical function or history of falls.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

 


Association between subjective sleep quality and future risk of falls in older people: results from LOHAS

17/08/2017

Source: The Journals of Gerontology

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 17 June 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Inadequate sleep is correlated with morbidity and mortality among older adults. However, the longitudinal relationship between subjective sleep quality and risk of falls in the elderly population remains to be clarified.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Falls-related drug use and risk of falls among older adults: a study in a US Medicare population

14/07/2017

Source: Drugs & Aging

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Date of publication: July 2017, vol. 34 iss. 7, pps 555–565

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The aim of this study was to examine the risk of falls relative to use patterns among new and continuing falls-related drug (FRD) users.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

 


Evaluation of falls sensor technology in acute care

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Sensor technology that dynamically identifies hospitalized patients’ fall risk and detects and alerts nurses of high-risk patients’ early exits out of bed has potential for reducing fall rates and preventing patient harm. In this study, a sensor was evaluated on two inpatient medical units to study fall characteristics and then to assign patient fall probability. A fall detection sensor system affords a level of surveillance that standard fall alert systems do not have. Fall prevention remains a complex issue, but sensor technology is a viable fall prevention option.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of an ICT-based fall-prevention system in community-dwelling older adults

16/06/2017

Source: International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 2017, Vol 106 p. 10-25

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Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A sedentary lifestyle and low levels of physical activity are major factors in fall risk for older adults. ICT-based interventions could possibly counteract the risk for this group, as studies show that such interventions significantly reduce it. However, this population is heterogeneous, and several factors (such as gender, age, fitness and others) may influence the use of these systems. This study analyses the iStoppFalls system, testing effectiveness and usage indicators, among other things.

Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Attitudes of older people with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment and their relatives about falls risk and prevention: a qualitative study

16/06/2017

Source: PLOS ONE

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Date of publication: May 19, 2017 vol. 12 iss. 5

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article explores the perceptions of older people with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment, and their family carers, about falling, falls risk and the acceptability of falls prevention interventions.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

 


Using Tai Chi to reduce fall risk factors among older adults: an evaluation of a community-based implementation

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of Applied Gerontology

Follow this link for the abstract 

Date of publication: 11th April 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to evaluate a community-based implementation of an evidence-based fall prevention program, in which 131 individuals participated in Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance. Self-report and functional performance assessments included demographics, health and fall history, the Activities-Specific Balance Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Functional Reach test. Pre–post scores were compared with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The mostly female participants were 73 years old, on average. At baseline, 18% reported being afraid or very afraid of falling, and 18% had fallen in the past 6 months. At follow-up, there was significant improvement in Timed Up and Go (p < .001), Functional Reach (p < .01), and Activities-Specific Balance Scale scores (p < .01). These results demonstrate that a 12-week evidence-based Tai Chi program can be feasibly implemented by novice instructors, is well-received by older adults, and can effectively reduce fall risk when implemented in community settings.

 Length of publication: 17 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Responsiveness of gait speed to physical exercise interventions in at-risk older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

17/05/2017

Source: Annals of geriatric medicine and Research 

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Date of publication: march 2017 vol. 21 iss. 1 pps. 17-23

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: In at-risk older adults, gait speed is an important factor associated with quality of life and falling risk. This study assesses whether therapeutic exercise could improve gait speed.

 Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Dopamine depletion in Parkinsons alters brain processing, impairing gait automaticity

18/04/2017

Source: NeuroImage, 2017, Vol 152 p. 207-220

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Impairments in motor automaticity cause patients with Parkinson’s disease to rely on attentional resources during gait, resulting in greater motor variability and a higher risk of falls. Although dopaminergic circuitry is known to play an important role in motor automaticity, little evidence exists on the neural mechanisms underlying the breakdown of locomotor automaticity in Parkinson’s disease. Overall, this study demonstrates that dopamine ameliorates gait automaticity in Parkinson’s disease by altering striatal, limbic and cerebellar processing, thereby informing future therapeutic avenues for gait and falls prevention.

Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.