Effects of an ICT-based fall-prevention system in community-dwelling older adults

16/06/2017

Source: International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 2017, Vol 106 p. 10-25

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Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A sedentary lifestyle and low levels of physical activity are major factors in fall risk for older adults. ICT-based interventions could possibly counteract the risk for this group, as studies show that such interventions significantly reduce it. However, this population is heterogeneous, and several factors (such as gender, age, fitness and others) may influence the use of these systems. This study analyses the iStoppFalls system, testing effectiveness and usage indicators, among other things.

Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Attitudes of older people with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment and their relatives about falls risk and prevention: a qualitative study

16/06/2017

Source: PLOS ONE

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Date of publication: May 19, 2017 vol. 12 iss. 5

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article explores the perceptions of older people with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment, and their family carers, about falling, falls risk and the acceptability of falls prevention interventions.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

 


Using Tai Chi to reduce fall risk factors among older adults: an evaluation of a community-based implementation

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of Applied Gerontology

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Date of publication: 11th April 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to evaluate a community-based implementation of an evidence-based fall prevention program, in which 131 individuals participated in Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance. Self-report and functional performance assessments included demographics, health and fall history, the Activities-Specific Balance Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Functional Reach test. Pre–post scores were compared with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The mostly female participants were 73 years old, on average. At baseline, 18% reported being afraid or very afraid of falling, and 18% had fallen in the past 6 months. At follow-up, there was significant improvement in Timed Up and Go (p < .001), Functional Reach (p < .01), and Activities-Specific Balance Scale scores (p < .01). These results demonstrate that a 12-week evidence-based Tai Chi program can be feasibly implemented by novice instructors, is well-received by older adults, and can effectively reduce fall risk when implemented in community settings.

 Length of publication: 17 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Responsiveness of gait speed to physical exercise interventions in at-risk older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

17/05/2017

Source: Annals of geriatric medicine and Research 

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Date of publication: march 2017 vol. 21 iss. 1 pps. 17-23

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: In at-risk older adults, gait speed is an important factor associated with quality of life and falling risk. This study assesses whether therapeutic exercise could improve gait speed.

 Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Dopamine depletion in Parkinsons alters brain processing, impairing gait automaticity

18/04/2017

Source: NeuroImage, 2017, Vol 152 p. 207-220

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Impairments in motor automaticity cause patients with Parkinson’s disease to rely on attentional resources during gait, resulting in greater motor variability and a higher risk of falls. Although dopaminergic circuitry is known to play an important role in motor automaticity, little evidence exists on the neural mechanisms underlying the breakdown of locomotor automaticity in Parkinson’s disease. Overall, this study demonstrates that dopamine ameliorates gait automaticity in Parkinson’s disease by altering striatal, limbic and cerebellar processing, thereby informing future therapeutic avenues for gait and falls prevention.

Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Is independence of older adults safe considering the risk of falls?

18/04/2017

Source: BMC Geriatrics

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Date of publication: 14 March 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The main objective of the study was to evaluate the degree of independence and find the fall risk factors in the study group.

 Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Falling while walking: a hidden contributor to pedestrian injury

17/03/2017

Source: Accident Analysis & Prevention, 2017, online

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This Australian study looks at the fall risk to pedestrians, given how beneficial and sustainable walking is as a mode of transport. Falling while walking may be a significant contributor to pedestrian injuries (the World Health Organisation has identified falls as the second-leading cause of unintentional injury death in older people) but little research has looked into this issue.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The efficacy of fall-risk-increasing drug (FRID) withdrawal for the prevention of falls and fall-related complications: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

17/03/2017

Source: BioMed Central Systematic Reviews

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Date of publication: 20 February 2017

 Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: Despite limited evidence of effectiveness, withdrawal (discontinuation or dose reduction) of high risk medications known as “fall-risk increasing drugs” (FRIDs) is typically conducted as a fall prevention strategy based on presumptive benefit. Our objective is to determine the efficacy of fall-risk increasing drugs (FRIDs) withdrawal on the prevention of falls and fall-related complications.

 Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


The influence of older adults’ beliefs and attitudes on adopting fall prevention behaviors

21/02/2017

Source: American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine 

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Date of publication: 17th January 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Among Americans aged 65 years and older, falls are the leading cause of injury death and disability, and finding effective methods to prevent older adult falls has become a public health priority. While research has identified effective interventions delivered in community and clinical settings, persuading older adults to adopt these interventions has been challenging. Older adults often do not acknowledge or recognize their fall risk. Many see falls as an inevitable consequence of aging. Health care providers can play an important role by identifying older adults who are likely to fall and providing clinical interventions to help reduce fall risks. Many older people respect the information and advice they receive from their providers. Health care practitioners can encourage patients to adopt effective fall prevention strategies by helping them understand and acknowledge their fall risk while emphasizing the positive benefits of fall prevention such as remaining independent. To help clinicians integrate fall prevention into their practice, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched the STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries) initiative. It provides health care providers in primary care settings with resources to help them screen older adult patients, assess their fall risk, and provide effective interventions.

 Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Effects of obesity in recovering stability after a treadmill slip

21/02/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effects of obesity on falls and dynamic stability control in young adults subjected to a standardized treadmill-induced gait-slip. Trials were categorized as a fall or recovery based on the reliance of the subject on external support following the slip. Compared with the normal-weight group, the obese group demonstrated less relative muscle strength and fell more after the slip. Obese people’s dynamic stability after slip was impaired possibly due to the inability of controlling the trunk segment’s backward lean movement. Obesity therefore most likely influences ability to recover from slips. Interventions must be aimed at balance recovery among individuals with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Spinal mobility and alignment leading to lower QoL and falling

21/02/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017, Volume 53 p. 98-103

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Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Spinal deformities can affect quality of life (QOL) and risk of falling, but no studies have explored the relationships of spinal mobility and sagittal alignment of spine and the lower extremities simultaneously. Purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship of those postural parameters to QOL and risk of falling. Forward-stooped posture and knee-flexion deformity could be important indicator of lower QOL. Moreover, limited extension in the lumbar spine could be a useful screening examination for fall prevention in the elderly.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Impact of fall prevention on nurses and care of fall risk patients

27/01/2017

Source: The Gerontologist 

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Date of publication: 23 December 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: “Results of this study identify unintended consequences of fall prevention message on nurses and older adult patients … Intense messaging from hospital administration to achieve zero falls resulted in nurses developing a fear of falls, protecting self and unit, and restricting fall risk patients as a way to stop messages and meet the hospital goal.” Further work is needed

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Changes in physical activity, sedentary time and risk of falling

27/01/2017

Source: Preventive Medicine, 2017, Vol 95 p. 103-109

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falling significantly affects quality of life, morbidity, and mortality among older adults. This study sought to evaluate the prospective association between sedentary time, physical activity, and falling among post-menopausal women aged 50–79 years recruited to the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study between 1993 and 1998 in the US. It followed recreational physical activity, sitting, sleeping and lean body mass. Falls per year were assessed annually. It found that physically active lifestyles increased falling amongst post-menopausal women. Additional fall prevention strategies, such as balance and resistance training, are needed to prevent diseases caused by inactivity.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Experiences with fall prevention technology within nursing homes

27/01/2017

Source: Geriatric Nursing, 2016, Online

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Date of publication: December 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This joint US and Dutch study investigated how existing fall prevention technology was experienced within nursing home nurses’ environment and workflow. Two case reports were constructed from interview and observational data comparing the magnitude of falls, safety cultures and technology characteristics/effectiveness. Across cases, 1) a coordinated communication system was essential in facilitating effective fall prevention alert response, and 2) nursing home safety culture is tightly associated with the chosen technological system.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to fid your local NHS Library.