Alzheimer’s Disease Increases Fall-related Bone Fracture Hospitalization in Elderly Chinese

17/11/2016

Source: International Journal of Gerontology, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2016

Publicati0n type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Fall and fracture risks are higher for older adults with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) than for older adults without dementia. This study investigated AD relating to hospitalization due to fall-related bone fracture in elderly Chinese patients. The proportion of patients in the AD group hospitalized because of fall-related bone fracture was significantly higher than in the control group. AD may increase the incidence of hospitalization due to falls and bone fracture. Our findings suggest that preventing falls in AD patients may reduce the number of hospitalized AD patients.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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Effects of 18-month low-magnitude high-frequency vibration on fall rate and fracture risks in 710 community elderly

15/07/2014

Source: Osteporosis International

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Date of publication: June 2014 25(6) pps. 1785 – 1795

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A prospective cluster-randomized controlled clinical trial involving 710 elderly subjects to investigate the long-term effects of low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) on fall and fracture rates, muscle performance, and bone quality.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Investigating the predictive ability of gait speed and quadriceps strength for incident falls in community-dwelling older women at high risk of fracture

14/05/2014

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

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Date of publication: May -June 2014 65(3) pps. 308-313

Publication type: journal article

In a nutshell: This article investigates whether quadriceps strength tests demonstrate similar predictive ability for incident falls as gait speed in older women.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Prospective evaluation of renal function, serum vitamin D level, and risk of fall and fracture in community-dwelling elderly subjects

16/04/2014

Source: Osteoporosis International

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2014 25(3) 923-932

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The link of vitamin D deficiency with the risk of falls in noninstitutionalized elderly subjects .

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Association of stressful life events with incident falls and fractures in older men

24/02/2014

Source: Age and Ageing

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: December 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A study to determine if major life events and/or sudden emotional stress may increase fall and fracture risk.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Predicting fracture risk using fall history amongst other factors

17/01/2013

Source: Bone, 2013, 52 (2) p. 541-547

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: December 2012 (online)

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The FRAXtr algorithm uses several different factors to predict fracture risk, but it does not use falls history as part of the calculation. This study analysed the benefit of using such a history when assessing men and women for fracture risk, finding that falls history can be a valid independent factor.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.