Quick adjustments during gait are less accurate through focal cerebellar lesions

17/10/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017, Volume 58 p. 390-393

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Online gait corrections are frequently used to restore gait stability and prevent falling. They require shorter response times than voluntary movements which suggests that subcortical pathways contribute to the execution of online gait corrections. To evaluate the cerebellum in these pathways two hypotheses were tested around accuracy of online gait corrections and the pronouncement of differences. The reduced ability to accurately adjust foot placement during walking in individuals with focal cerebellar lesions appears to be a general movement control deficit, which could contribute to increased fall risk.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Strategies used by transtibial amputees to prevent falling during gait

13/12/2013

Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2013, Vol 94 no 11 p. 2186-2193

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Date of publication: November 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looked at the strategies such amputees use to cope with gait stability and adaptability, and how these differ from those adopted by able-bodied controls. It found that amputees can use the same strategies to deal with these challenges and to prevent falls, though they tended to walk more slowly than those in the control group.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Falls and spinal muscular atrophy: exploring cause and prevention

16/05/2013

Source: Muscle and Nerve, 2013, 47 (1) p. 118-123

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Weakness and gait variability are associated with falls in various neurological conditions, and fatigue is well documented in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). However, the relationship of weakness, fatigue and gait variability to falls has not been investigated. Several patients with SMA completed a falls history questionnaire to analyse variables. Strength, fatigue and other gait variables were not found to impact on falls probability, but stride-length variability was.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.