Physical-cognitive training enhances posture during life tasks in older adults

17/10/2017

Source: Experimental Gerontology, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Physical-cognitive interventions seem promising to improve balance and gait performances and prevent falls in the elderly. Although these beneficial effects, it is still not clear whether these physical-cognitive training modalities leads to more general non-specific adaptations that can be transferred to some measures reflecting every day abilities.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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Does dual task training improve walking performance of older adults with concern of falling?

17/10/2017

Source: BMC Geriatrics

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 11 September 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Older adults with concerns of falling show decrements of gait stability under single (ST) and dual task (DT) conditions. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of a DT training integrating task managing strategies for independent living older adults with and without concern about falling (CoF) to a non-training control group on walking performance under ST and DT conditions.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


The effects of haptic input on biomechanical and neurophysiological parameters of walking

15/09/2017

Source: Gait and Posture, 2107, Vol 58 p. 232-239

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Walking requires sensorimotor integration to be successful. Adding haptic input via light touch or anchors has been shown to improve standing balance, but its effects on walking are not clear. This scoping review summarises the current evidence for haptic input on walking in adults. Results show that adding haptic input changes walking behaviour. In particular, there is an immediate reduction in variability of gait step parameters and whole body stability, as well as a decrease in lower limb muscle activity. However, more investigation is needed.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Dance movement therapy and falls prevention

16/06/2017

Source: Maturitas, 2017, Vol 102 p. 1-5

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people which may improve various health outcomes in this population such as balance, gait and muscle performance. This study conducted a systematic review considering all RCTs investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. In two out of three RCTs, dancing improved this. However, there is a paucity of studies on dancing and falls, so the evidence is preliminary and equivocal.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this lik to find your local NHS Library.


Dopamine depletion in Parkinsons alters brain processing, impairing gait automaticity

18/04/2017

Source: NeuroImage, 2017, Vol 152 p. 207-220

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Impairments in motor automaticity cause patients with Parkinson’s disease to rely on attentional resources during gait, resulting in greater motor variability and a higher risk of falls. Although dopaminergic circuitry is known to play an important role in motor automaticity, little evidence exists on the neural mechanisms underlying the breakdown of locomotor automaticity in Parkinson’s disease. Overall, this study demonstrates that dopamine ameliorates gait automaticity in Parkinson’s disease by altering striatal, limbic and cerebellar processing, thereby informing future therapeutic avenues for gait and falls prevention.

Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Adaptive gait responses to an impending fall during treadmill walking

19/10/2016

Source: Gait and Posture, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Humans have been shown to adapt their gait when aware of potential slip risks when walking, though it is unknown if these adaptations also happen on a treadmill. This study sought investigate this possibility. It found that humans do adapt their gait when aware of possible risks compared to normal walking, by taking shorter steps and flattening their feet on impact, as well as repositioning their body centre. This could provide insights into dynamic stability control when individuals anticipate potential slip risk when treadmill walking.

Length of publication: 23 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Ankle dorsiflexion may be important in falls in fibromyalgic women

15/05/2015

Source: Clinical Biomechanics, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Fibromyalgia produces chronic pain and allows only for a reduced range of motion, which leads to gait changes and a high incidence of falls. Intervention programmes can be designed by understanding these gait patterns. This study was designed to evaluate the range of motion of the hip and ankle joints in women with and without fibromyalgia. Ranges of motion were similar between groups except that fibromyalgia sufferers showed higher plantar flexion and lower dorsiflexion. Improved ankle kinematics in this group may help prevent falls and improve mobility.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Alexander Technique training on gait behaviour in older adults

19/03/2015

Source: Journal of Body and Movement Therapies, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Age-related changes in gait, which can cause a heightened falls risk, is a serious health issue faced by older adults. The Alexander Technique is thought to improve balance and motor function, but the technique’s effect on gait has not been investigated. This study sought to examine the effect of Alexander technique training in older adults. The findings suggest superior control of dynamic stability during gait and potentially reduced fall risk in Alexander Technique teachers, both of which mean the technique warrants further study.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of Alexander Technique on Gait Behaviour in Older Adults

17/02/2015

Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 2015 (online)

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Age-related changes in gait can produce a heightened fall risk, which is a serious health issue faced by older adults. The Alexander Technique is thought to improve balance and motor function, but its effect on gait has not been studied, which this study sought to correct. The findings suggest superior control of dynamic stability during gait and potentially reduced fall risk, which warrant further study.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Recognition of gait cycle phases using wearable sensors

17/12/2014

Source: Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 2014, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This paper looks at the normal cycle of walking and gait using pressure and force measurements to ultimately help predict abnormal walking patterns which could lead to falling.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.