Cross-cultural validation of the falls efficacy scale international in elderly

21/04/2016

Source: Journal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to describe the psychometric properties of cultural adaptations of the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) in the elderly dwelling in the community. It used a systematic literature review to look into the question. The FES-I is considered acceptable, understandable to measure the fear of falling in the elderly, valid, reliable and comparable cross—culturally, so it is recommended in rehabilitation research, clinical trials and practice, and in fall-prevention programmes in the elderly.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Fall rates in hospital rehabilitation units after individualised education programmes

15/05/2015

Source: The Lancet, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are the most frequent adverse events that are reported in hospitals. The effectiveness of individualised falls-prevention education for patients were examined, supported by training and feedback for staff, delivered as a ward-level programme. Eight rehabilitation units in general hospitals in Australia participated. Individualised patient education programmes combined with training and feedback to staff added to usual care were found to reduce the rates of falls and injurious falls in older patients in rehabilitation hospital-units.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Elderly participation in daily life with falls prevention after discharge

15/08/2014

Source: Disability and Rehabilitation, 2014, Vol 36 no 10 p.787-796

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This is a systematic review and meta-analysis designed to investigate the impact of falls prevention programmes on older adults who are returning home to live after being discharged from hospital. It uses peer-reviewed articles and grey literature to show that falls interventions provided a positive improvement in patients’ participation levels, finding a causal association. The effect size was small, but the study suggests that participation needs to be considered in future falls prevention research.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Royal Melbourne Hospital Falls Risk Assessment Tool for post-stroke patients

16/06/2014

Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 2014, Vol 21 no 4 p. 607-611

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls after a stroke are common and carry a significant disease burden. It is good practice to predict those who are at risk of falls to implement prevention techniques and therapy. This study aimed to determine the validity of a tool developed by the Royal Melbourne Hospital. In both high-risk and medium-risk groups, the tool did not offer sufficient predictive value.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Promoting participation in fall prevention strategies

16/06/2014

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2014, Vol 59 no 1 p. 136-144

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: July-August 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Participation by older adults in fall prevention strategies is often poor: while they believe a strategy works in general, they often feel like it won’t benefit them personally. This Australian study aims to describe the frequency and reasons for older adults identifying prevention strategies as being ‘better for others than for me’. Strategies to promote participation may need to convince older adults that they too are at risk of falls and that the activities they currently take part in may not be enough to prevent falls and injury.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


NICE consultation on social care includes recommendation on falls

16/04/2014

Source: ProFaNE website

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Date of publication: February 2014

Publication type: Website news article

In a nutshell: New NICE quality standards and guidance to improve social care have been published, which contain recommendations on falls in older people and how they can regain independence afterwards.

Length of publication: 1 page


Designing and evaluating an electronic patient falls reporting system

13/12/2013

Source: International Journal of Medical Informatics, 2013, Vol 82 no 11 p. e294-e306

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: November 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Electronic falls reporting systems can often aid improvement efforts to prevent patient falls, thereby saving money and lives, but many long term care facilities either can’t or won’t invest in such systems due to costs or lack of staff training. This paper looks at a system that is easy to use, and with no initial investment costs aside from personnel to set up.

Length of publication: 12 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The relationship among falls, rehabilitation outcomes and health services use

13/12/2013

Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2013, Vol 14 no 11 p. 832-836

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: November 2013

Publication Type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looked at determining the characteristics associated with single and multiple fallers in a post-acute rehabilitation centre. It found that the majority of fallers were older males who were frail and suffered cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms. Multiple fallers were particularly at risk of poor functional recovery and increased health service use. Specific programs targeting these patients should be developed in further studies.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact you local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Using a wireless sensor network to monitor patients with Parkinson’s

15/11/2013

Source: Procedia Computer Science, 2013, Vol 19 p. 956-961

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: October 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This research focuses on non-invasive wireless monitoring of elderly patients with Parkinson’s disease for early signs of falls, to try and prevent potential falls and injuries. It specifically focuses on Freezing of Gait at home and plans to build up a mobility pattern for the person which can be fed into the system to help prevent possible falls.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Unable to get up after falling – what should we do?

24/09/2013

Source: ProFaNE website

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Date of publication: August 2013

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: This article, originally from the AgeUK website, asks whether more can be done to get rid of the worst case fall scenario: a vulnerable older person falls and is unable to call for help. The person is therefore being left lying on the floor alone for long periods. Topics include not using fall alarms, and the common scenario where care is provided but some aspects aren’t considered and care is not joined up.

Length of publication: 1 page


Grip strength among older people in different healthcare settings

24/09/2013

Source: Age and Ageing, 2013, online

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: August 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Low muscle strength causes many different problems among the elderly, and has been well documented in those living at home. This study investigates its epidemiology in older people who are in rehabilitation or long-term care. It found that older people living in the community had higher grip strength than people in care, and that grip strength also varied widely between healthcare settings. This research will have implications on falls research.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Preventing falls in care homes: a question of balance

24/09/2013

Source: Geriatric Medicine, 2013

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Date of publication: July 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The elderly are three times more likely to suffer from a fall when in a care home compared to living in their own home. Due to fears of litigation from injuries, staff are likely to restrict movement of people in their care, but this also has the effect of restricting their freedom and quality of life. This article discusses ways around this problem.

Length of publication: 1 page


Benzodiazepines should be avoided by older people

24/09/2013

Source: Age and Ageing, 2013, online

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: July 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article drew research from two different studies to compare whether long-acting benzodiazepines (LBs) create a higher risk of falls in the elderly than short-acting benzodiazepines (SBs). It found that SBs do not lower the risk of falls any more than LBs, and recommends strongly discouraging the use of both in the elderly.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effect of whole-body vibration exercises in frail and elderly patients

19/08/2013

Source: Clinical Rehabilitation, 2013, online

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Date of publication: July 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This randomised controlled trial tested whole body vibration exercises compared to usual care and exercises for 8 weeks, to see how they compared in tests of general health, balance, mobility and knee extensor strength. The vibration exercises were found to be able to improve each area of testing, meaning that they could be a valuable tool in preventing falls.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.