Reducing falls can help trusts improve patient experience and reduce costs

17/08/2017

Source: NHS Improvement, 2017

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: This report from NHS Improvement provides a picture of the scale of inpatient falls and the benefits to the NHS if the rate in hospitals was reduced. It followed the successful completion of their collaboration between 19 trusts to adopt improvement methodologies and creating a learning community to discuss changes. Results include the observation that older patients represent 77% of total falls, but 87% of total costs – reducing this group by around 25-30% could result in annual savings of up to £170m.

Length of publication: 1 page


Mid Yorks NHS Trust adopts physio-designed training to prevent falls

17/08/2017

Source: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, 2017, online

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News article

In a nutshell: Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust has launched falls prevention training for staff which recreates real-life situations in allocated sections of actual wards and clinics.

Length of publication: 1 page


Evaluation of falls sensor technology in acute care

14/07/2017

Source: The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 2017, online

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Sensor technology that dynamically identifies hospitalized patients’ fall risk and detects and alerts nurses of high-risk patients’ early exits out of bed has potential for reducing fall rates and preventing patient harm. In this study, a sensor was evaluated on two inpatient medical units to study fall characteristics and then to assign patient fall probability. A fall detection sensor system affords a level of surveillance that standard fall alert systems do not have. Fall prevention remains a complex issue, but sensor technology is a viable fall prevention option.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A hierarchical alarm model for elderly fall prevention sensors

17/05/2017

Source: Pervasive and Mobile Computing, 2017, online

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: New technologies allow for automatic monitoring of hospitalised older people, helping clinical staff to supervise to reduce falls. This paper introduces a hierarchical model to predict alarming states in a sensor worn over clothes. The hierarchy predicts levels of danger to warn clinical staff of possible fall danger.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to  find your local NHS Library.


Acceptability of the 6-PACK falls prevention program: a pre-implementation study in hospitals participating in a cluster randomized controlled trial

17/03/2017

Source: PLOS One

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Date of publication: 15 February 2017

 Publication type:

In a nutshell: There is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of falls prevention interventions in the acute hospital setting. The 6-PACK falls prevention program includes a fall-risk tool; ‘falls alert’ signs; supervision of patients in the bathroom; ensuring patients’ walking aids are within reach; toileting regimes; low-low beds; and bed/chair alarms. This study explored the acceptability of the 6-PACK program from the perspective of nurses and senior staff prior to its implementation in a randomised controlled trial.

 Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients

21/04/2016

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2016, online

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient falls within hospitals are mainly preventable, but are a serious source of incidents among older patients. This study seeks to identify possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls, which is lacking in literature, such as patient motions, environmental design factors in bathrooms, and clinician zones in a patient’s room. Results suggest that only motion-related factors contribute significantly to falls in the bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute in the clinician zone. Future work includes updating environmental design factors associated with these motions in a patient’s room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Hospital sorry for man’s death after two falls

17/11/2015

Source: Edinburgh Evening News

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Date of publication: 4th November 2015

Publication type: News article

In a nutshell: An Edinburgh hospital has been forced to apologise as well as review its falls risk assessment after an elderly patient dies after fall.

Length of publication: One page

 

 


Fall rates in hospital rehabilitation units after individualised education programmes

15/05/2015

Source: The Lancet, 2015, online

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Date of publication: April 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are the most frequent adverse events that are reported in hospitals. The effectiveness of individualised falls-prevention education for patients were examined, supported by training and feedback for staff, delivered as a ward-level programme. Eight rehabilitation units in general hospitals in Australia participated. Individualised patient education programmes combined with training and feedback to staff added to usual care were found to reduce the rates of falls and injurious falls in older patients in rehabilitation hospital-units.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Are Interprofessional Roundtable Debriefings Useful in Decreasing ED Fall Rates?

15/05/2015

Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing, 2015, online

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Date of publication: April 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: There are more than one million patient falls each year in the United States. Falls are known to be a sign of poor health, are a marker of a decline in function, and are associated with a decline in morbidity. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a Falls Roundtable intervention for reducing the rates of patient falls in an urban academic trauma centre emergency department. The Falls Roundtable incident debriefing intervention alone does not appear to be an effective tool for fall prevention in the ED setting but may serve as an integral component of a multifaceted fall-reduction strategy.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Royal Melbourne Hospital Falls Risk Assessment Tool for post-stroke patients

16/06/2014

Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 2014, Vol 21 no 4 p. 607-611

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Date of publication: April 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls after a stroke are common and carry a significant disease burden. It is good practice to predict those who are at risk of falls to implement prevention techniques and therapy. This study aimed to determine the validity of a tool developed by the Royal Melbourne Hospital. In both high-risk and medium-risk groups, the tool did not offer sufficient predictive value.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The cost of falls prevention in Torbay

24/09/2013

Source:  ProFaNE website

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Date of publication: August 2013

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: This publication, from The King’s Fund, lists number of incidents and their associated costs in one area of England. It explores not just the costs associated with incidents, but also ongoing care costs and how they are distributed between different care providers such as hospitals and social care systems.

Length of publication: 1 page


How cost-effective are shock-absorbing hospital floors to prevent fall injuries?

24/09/2013

Source: Age and Ageing, 2013, online

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Date of publication: July 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This analysis drew information from a randomised controlled trail as well as wider literature, and looked into the cost-effectiveness of installing shock-absorbing floors into hospitals for older people. Initial results show such floors can be cost-effective in reducing falls injuries, but further research is needed to deduce whether the floors cause a higher fall rate.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important information: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Trials of floors to reduce elderly falls injuries in wards

24/09/2013

Source: Age and Ageing, 2013, 42 (5) p. 633-640

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Date of publication: September 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This English randomised controlled trial looked into fall injury rates for shock-absorbing flooring in wards for the elderly, as well as severity of injury, fall rate and adverse events. It also gives recommendations for future research.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Grip strength among older people in different healthcare settings

24/09/2013

Source: Age and Ageing, 2013, online

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Date of publication: August 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Low muscle strength causes many different problems among the elderly, and has been well documented in those living at home. This study investigates its epidemiology in older people who are in rehabilitation or long-term care. It found that older people living in the community had higher grip strength than people in care, and that grip strength also varied widely between healthcare settings. This research will have implications on falls research.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.