NICE guideline update: older people at risk of hospital falls

19/07/2013

Source: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence website

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Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Website news item

In a nutshell: New NICE guidelines published last month state that health professionals should consider patients over 65, or those over 50 with certain conditions such as strokes, as being high risk for falling while in hospital. Falls cost the NHS around £2.3 billion per year, and may cause death, serious injury such as fractures or head injuries, and minor cuts and bruises. The guidance calls for clinicians to assess risks of falling and consider multifactorial interventions.

Length of publication: 1 page


Referral by prehospital emergency services to a community-based falls-prevention service

19/07/2013

Source: Injury Prevention, 2013, 19 (2) p. 134-138

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Date of publication: April 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Identifying people at risk of a serious fall before they require hospital treatment allows early intervention as well as a possible reduction in further falls and healthcare costs. This Australian project aimed to set up a referral pathway for older people to contact a community falls-prevention team. An education package, referral pathway and follow-up procedures were developed and outcome measures collected to compare people put onto the different pathways. However, even though the project had support from various levels of management, it did not result in any referrals to the pathway. Possible reasons for this are explained.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Prevention of patient falls: a case study

19/07/2013

Source: Apollo Medicine, 2013, 10 (2) p. 175-180

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Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: According to research, the majority (78%) of falls in hospital are anticipated, and very few are unanticipated (8%) or accidental (14%). Guidelines to prevent falls have helped to reduce the numbers and increase patient safety.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Imbalance and fall risk in multiple sclerosis

17/06/2013

Source: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America, 2013, 24(2) p. 337-354

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Date of publication: May 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Multiple Sclerosis sufferers fall frequently due to impaired balance and walking. Therefore high quality measures of balance and fall risk are essential for identifying those in need of interventions in these areas as well as the most suitable interventions. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is recommended here.

Length of publication: 17 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of fall injury type on mortality and hospitalisation

17/06/2013

Source: Accident Analysis & Prevention, 2013, 50 p. 887-894

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Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This longitudinal Taiwanese study found that traumatic brain injuries after falling were most likely to result in death or hospital admissions, while people with hip and vertebral fractures were most likely to improve during the year after injury. Nursing home care is more likely to result in death or hospital admissions than home care. As well as primary fall prevention techniques, more research on mechanisms leading to traumatic brain injuries during a fall is needed to improve secondary fall prevention programmes for older people.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Neurovascular assessment post femoral nerve block: implications on fall prevention

17/06/2013

Source: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, 2013, 17(2) p. 99-105

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Date of publication: May 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Femoral Nerve Blocks have become widely used to reduce pain after joint replacement surgery, and are directly linked to a reduction in drug-related side-effects. However, ineffectual assessment of residual nerve blocks can result in patients falling or having a near miss. The paper re-examines the assessment tool used and recognises potential interventions that might ensure patient safety.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Fall-related fracture trends among the elderly in Sweden

17/06/2013

Source: Journal of Safety Research, 2013, 45, p. 141-145

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Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study explored Swedish trends in fall-related fractures between 1998 and 2010. It looked at different groups of elderly people and the incidence of different types of fracture in each. It found more serious fractures were decreasing, especially hips fractures which had been focused on more, whereas less serious fractures were increasing and there was less focus on them. It also indicated an impact on industry where healthier younger elderly people and more frail older elderly people needed better healthcare, but for less serious injuries.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Changes in fall prevention policies in hospitals

16/05/2013

Source: Age and Ageing, 2013, 42 (1) p. 106-109

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Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: In 2007, the National Patient Safety Agency published two pieces of information aimed at reducing falls risk. This study aimed to identify changes directly resulting from these publications. Several Trusts instituted a falls prevention policy and/or a bedrail policy, and falls risk assessments began to be evidence based rather than unreferenced. These changes in policy were likely to be influenced by the NPSA publications, but also by publications brought out by agencies such as the Royal College of Physicians and the Medicine and Healthcare products’ Regulatory Agency. Further improvements are still required.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.