Mobility Communication Charts

18/04/2017

Source: The Academy of NHS Fabulous Stuff

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Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: This research looked into ways of more effective fast communication to all members of a multi-disciplinary team to see clearly at a glance the mobile status of a patient after physiotherapy treatment. Members looked at the viability and usefulness of having a permanent, documented and easy to use communication method at the patient’s bedside using a colour chart and key. This could be read by health professionals and family members even at a distance, ensuring patients receive the correct level of assistance for their current level of mobility.

Length of publication: 1 page


Every year, 1,200 seniors admitted to hospital after a fall

21/06/2016

Source: Sudbury.com

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Date of publication: 25th May 2016

Publication type: News article

In a nutshell: Now into its second year, the Sudbury and District Health Unit plans to build on its Stay on Your Feet collaboration with the North East Local Health Integration Network (LHIN).

Length of publication: One page

 

 

 


Assisted device use and mobility-related factors among older adults

17/11/2015

Source: Journal of Safety Research, 2015, online

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looks into how the use of assisted devices such as walking sticks relates to other mobility factors, which can then further provide insight into older adults’ future mobility needs. It showed that effective fall-prevention interventions and innovative transport options are needed to protect the mobility of this high-risk group, as mobility serves to preserve their independence.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact you local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Mobility and cognition are associated with wellbeing and health related quality of life among older adults

14/08/2015

Source: BMC Geriatrics

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Date of publication: 5th July 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell:  A study which attempts to identify key clinically relevant outcome measures of mobility and cognitive function that explain variation in wellbeing and health related quality of life (HRQoL) among community dwelling older adults.

Length of publication: One page

 

 

 


Mobility is key predictor of wellbeing changes among older fallers

15/05/2015

Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2015, online

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Date of publication: April 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A study designed to determine the factors that predict changes in wellbeing over time in older people presenting to the Vancouver Falls Prevention Clinic.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Obstacle course training can improve mobility and prevent falls in people with intellectual disabilities.

14/05/2014

Source: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research

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Date of publication: May 2014 58(5) pps 485 -492

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell:  A study to evaluate whether obstacle course training can improve mobility and prevent falls in people with intellectual disabilities.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Neuropsychological, balance, and mobility risk factors for falls in people with multiple sclerosis: a prospective cohort study

16/04/2014

Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and rehabilitation

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Date of publication: March 2014 95(3) pps480-6

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A study to determine whether impaired performance in a range of vision, proprioception, neuropsychological, balance, and mobility tests and pain and fatigue are associated with falls in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Yoga can significantly improve balance and mobility

19/08/2013

Source: Australian Ageing Agenda, 2013

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Date of publication: July 2013

Publication type: News bulletin

In a nutshell: A pilot study carried out by researchers at the University of Sydney has confirmed what has been long believed to be true: yoga can significantly improve balance and mobility in older people. The study ran over a twelve week period, and results showed improvement in a range of measures. Older people who perform well in these balance and mobility tests are said to be about half as likely to fall as people with poor mobility.

Length of publication: 1 page


Depressive symptoms may predict falls in older Taiwanese people

14/12/2012

Source: Age and Ageing, 2012, 41(5) p. 606-612

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Date of publication: September 2012

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated depressive symptoms in older, community-dwelling adults in Taiwan, to see if they had any effect on the prevalence of falls. The participants were tested for their sensorimotor, balance and mobility and then followed up over two years. Depressive symptoms were common in older people, and were associated with an increased risk of falls. Findings suggest that falls prevention strategies should include interventions for depression along with those for strength, balance and maximising vision.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of this article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.