Effects of vibration training in reducing risk of slip-related falls among young adults with obesity

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study examined the effects of controlled whole-body vibration training on reducing risk of slip-related falls in obese people. Twenty-three young adults with obesity were randomly assigned into either the vibration or placebo group. Both groups were also exposed to a standardized slip induced by a treadmill during gait prior to and following the training. Dynamic stability and fall incidences responding to the slip were also assessed. The results indicated that vibration training significantly increased the muscle strength and improved dynamic stability control at recovery touchdown after the slip occurrence. Vibration-based training could be a promising alternative or additional modality to active exercise-based fall prevention programs for people with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Dopamine depletion in Parkinsons alters brain processing, impairing gait automaticity

18/04/2017

Source: NeuroImage, 2017, Vol 152 p. 207-220

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Impairments in motor automaticity cause patients with Parkinson’s disease to rely on attentional resources during gait, resulting in greater motor variability and a higher risk of falls. Although dopaminergic circuitry is known to play an important role in motor automaticity, little evidence exists on the neural mechanisms underlying the breakdown of locomotor automaticity in Parkinson’s disease. Overall, this study demonstrates that dopamine ameliorates gait automaticity in Parkinson’s disease by altering striatal, limbic and cerebellar processing, thereby informing future therapeutic avenues for gait and falls prevention.

Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The degree of misjudgment between perceived and actual gait ability

19/12/2016

Source: Gait & posture, 2017, Vol 51 p. 275-280

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Carrying out motor tasks successfully means a person’s perception of their physical abilities must be integrated with a perception of the task itself. Geriatric decline in physical and cognitive abilities may lead to misjudgements and possibly errors leading to loss of balance. This study aimed to quantify how much older adults misjudge their actual gait ability. Better abilities did not appear to be associated with better judgement – in fact, a range of misjudgements showed. This could provide insight into the interplay between cognition and physical abilities, and add value towards fall prevention and promotion of healthy ageing.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Evidence of compensatory joint kinetics on stairs in Parkinson’s disease

19/12/2016

Source: Gait and Posture, 2017, Vol 52 p. 33-39

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of pulication: February 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Using stairs requires larger joint movements than simply walking and preventing lower limb collapse depends on large enough movement in the hip, knee and ankle. However, people with Parkinson’s disease often can’t control their lower limbs which can increase fall risk. They also rely more heavily on knee extensor muscles which can provide them with an increased sense of stability.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Fall risk post-stroke: Examining paretic limbs around forward gait slips

25/07/2016

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Community-dwelling stroke survivors show a high incidence of falls with unexpected external perturbations during dynamic activities like walking. Previous evidence has demonstrated the importance of compensatory stepping to restore dynamic stability in response to perturbations in hemiparetic stroke survivors. However, these studies were limited to either stance perturbations or perturbation induced under the unaffected limb. This study aimed to compare the differences, if any, between the non-paretic and paretic sides in dynamic stability and protective stepping strategies when exposed to unexpected external perturbation during walking.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The characteristics of walking strategy in elderly patients with diabetes

21/06/2016

Source: International Journal of Nursing Sciences, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study explored the walking strategy by monitoring the characteristics of centre of pressure (COP) of gait in the elderly with type2 diabetes. It puts forward the walking strategy according to the abnormal COP trajectory. Since elderly people with diabetes have a high risk of falling, the rehabilitation nursing should be strengthened to include the training of enhancing proprioception to prevent these patients with type 2 diabetes from falling.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Libary for the full text of the article. Followi this link to find your local NHS Library.


Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients

21/04/2016

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient falls within hospitals are mainly preventable, but are a serious source of incidents among older patients. This study seeks to identify possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls, which is lacking in literature, such as patient motions, environmental design factors in bathrooms, and clinician zones in a patient’s room. Results suggest that only motion-related factors contribute significantly to falls in the bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute in the clinician zone. Future work includes updating environmental design factors associated with these motions in a patient’s room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Falls and Balance Impairments in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

16/02/2016

Source: Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 2016, Vol 40 no 1 p. 6-9

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Older adults with type 2 diabetes are far more likely to fall than those without, and the consequences of these falls include avoiding activity, gradual immobility and mortality. Balance is one of the most common risk factors, which is associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This is therefore the central focus of falls prevention research and interventions in these cases. But certain studies have found those without major complications of DPN to be at increased falls risk as well, associating with subtle declines in sensorimotor and cognitive function. Knowledge of this may help fall prevention strategies.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Non-spatial memory influencing reach-grasp responses and loss of balance

16/02/2016

Source: Gait and Posture, 2016, Vol 45 p. 51-55

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Balance recovery after loss of balance is crucial to falls prevention, head trauma and other major injuries in older adults. When a fall occurs, little is known about the role of memory and attention shifting on the reach to grasp recovery strategy and what factors determine the response’s speed and precision beyond simple reaction time. Older adults were found demonstrate significantly increased movement time and grasping errors.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Video games for senior citizens to prevent falls

16/02/2016

Source: Trustech: the North West NHS innovation service

Follow this link for information

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: An innovation from Trafford Hospitals (CMFT) and the University of Manchester will help to reduce the number of falls in the older population. Exergames utilises Microsoft Kinect gaming technology to help improve strength, co-ordination and movement of its target users; elderly people at risk from falls.

Length of publication: 1 page


Assisted device use and mobility-related factors among older adults

17/11/2015

Source: Journal of Safety Research, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looks into how the use of assisted devices such as walking sticks relates to other mobility factors, which can then further provide insight into older adults’ future mobility needs. It showed that effective fall-prevention interventions and innovative transport options are needed to protect the mobility of this high-risk group, as mobility serves to preserve their independence.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact you local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Factors contributing to falls in older adults and nursing implications

15/10/2015

Source: Geriatric Nursing, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are a common cause of serious injury and death in the older adult population, associated with multiple risks such as age, history of falls, impaired mobility, balance and gait problems, and medications. Sensory and environmental factors as well as the fear of falling may also increase the risk of falls. This article reviews current best practice on screening fall risks and fear of falling, fall prevention strategies, and fall prevention resources to assist gerontological nurses in reducing falls by their older adult clients.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Vitamin D and sarcopenia/falls

10/07/2015

Source: Journal of Clinical Densitometry, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Sarcopenia involves loss of muscle mass as the body ages, and evidence suggests that vitamin D is important for muscle structure and function: maintenance of adequate vitamin D status is therefore a stratagem to consider for sarcopenia prevention and treatment. This article summarises the potential effects of vitamin D on muscle structure and function and provides guidance for vitamin D supplementation in prevention and treatment of sarcopenia and falls.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Age-related differences in inter-joint coordination during stair walking transitions

15/06/2015

Source: Gait & Posture, 2015, Online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Using stairs can be difficult and hazardous as locomotor tasks for older people with fall incidents reported frequently. This study looked at inter-joint coordination to provide insights into age-related changes in neuromuscular control of gait that can inform prevention or intervention strategies. The findings suggest that normal aging adults have less independent control of adjacent joints compared to younger adults suggesting they have less flexibility to modulate inter-joints coordination appropriately during stair walking transitions.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.