Non-spatial memory influencing reach-grasp responses and loss of balance

16/02/2016

Source: Gait and Posture, 2016, Vol 45 p. 51-55

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Balance recovery after loss of balance is crucial to falls prevention, head trauma and other major injuries in older adults. When a fall occurs, little is known about the role of memory and attention shifting on the reach to grasp recovery strategy and what factors determine the response’s speed and precision beyond simple reaction time. Older adults were found demonstrate significantly increased movement time and grasping errors.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Video games for senior citizens to prevent falls

16/02/2016

Source: Trustech: the North West NHS innovation service

Follow this link for information

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: An innovation from Trafford Hospitals (CMFT) and the University of Manchester will help to reduce the number of falls in the older population. Exergames utilises Microsoft Kinect gaming technology to help improve strength, co-ordination and movement of its target users; elderly people at risk from falls.

Length of publication: 1 page


Assisted device use and mobility-related factors among older adults

17/11/2015

Source: Journal of Safety Research, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looks into how the use of assisted devices such as walking sticks relates to other mobility factors, which can then further provide insight into older adults’ future mobility needs. It showed that effective fall-prevention interventions and innovative transport options are needed to protect the mobility of this high-risk group, as mobility serves to preserve their independence.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact you local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Factors contributing to falls in older adults and nursing implications

15/10/2015

Source: Geriatric Nursing, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are a common cause of serious injury and death in the older adult population, associated with multiple risks such as age, history of falls, impaired mobility, balance and gait problems, and medications. Sensory and environmental factors as well as the fear of falling may also increase the risk of falls. This article reviews current best practice on screening fall risks and fear of falling, fall prevention strategies, and fall prevention resources to assist gerontological nurses in reducing falls by their older adult clients.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Vitamin D and sarcopenia/falls

10/07/2015

Source: Journal of Clinical Densitometry, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Sarcopenia involves loss of muscle mass as the body ages, and evidence suggests that vitamin D is important for muscle structure and function: maintenance of adequate vitamin D status is therefore a stratagem to consider for sarcopenia prevention and treatment. This article summarises the potential effects of vitamin D on muscle structure and function and provides guidance for vitamin D supplementation in prevention and treatment of sarcopenia and falls.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Age-related differences in inter-joint coordination during stair walking transitions

15/06/2015

Source: Gait & Posture, 2015, Online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Using stairs can be difficult and hazardous as locomotor tasks for older people with fall incidents reported frequently. This study looked at inter-joint coordination to provide insights into age-related changes in neuromuscular control of gait that can inform prevention or intervention strategies. The findings suggest that normal aging adults have less independent control of adjacent joints compared to younger adults suggesting they have less flexibility to modulate inter-joints coordination appropriately during stair walking transitions.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Can toe-ground footwear margin alter swing-foot ground clearance?

15/06/2015

Source: Gait & Posture, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Greater swing foot-ground clearance is functional for tripping prevention, as trips frequently occur due to the lowest part of the shoe contacting the walking surface. Shoe design effects on swing foot-ground clearance are, therefore, important considerations. Increasing swing ankle dorsiflexion can maximise the space between the ground and the toe, which is effective for tripping prevention. However, further research is needed.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Biomechanical predictors of balance recovery amongst community-dwelling older adults

15/05/2015

Source: Experimental Gerontology, 2015, Vol 66 p. 39-46

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are prevalent in older adults and are predicted by the maximum forward lean magnitude that can be recovered using a single step. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contribution of neuromuscular and biomechanical variables associated with balance recovery. Findings confirm that successful recovery from forward loss of balance is a whole body control task that requires adequate trunk control and generation of adequate lower limb moments to generate a long and rapid step. Training programmes that specifically target these measures may be effective in improving balance recovery performance and thereby contribute to fall prevention amongst older adults.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.