Vitamin D for physical performance/osteoporosis in older African Americans

18/01/2018

Source: Contemporary Clinical Trials, 2018, Vol 65 p. 39-45

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2018

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with bone loss, poor muscle strength, falls and fracture. This information in older African Americans (AAs) is sparse. This RCT examined the effect of vitamin D on bone loss and physical performance in older AA women. This is the first study to show an association between free 25OHD and physical performance. These findings indicate a positive relationship of free 25OHD with gait speed and grip strength in older AA women. Further studies are needed to understand the role of free 25OHD.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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Effects of obesity in recovering stability after a treadmill slip

21/02/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effects of obesity on falls and dynamic stability control in young adults subjected to a standardized treadmill-induced gait-slip. Trials were categorized as a fall or recovery based on the reliance of the subject on external support following the slip. Compared with the normal-weight group, the obese group demonstrated less relative muscle strength and fell more after the slip. Obese people’s dynamic stability after slip was impaired possibly due to the inability of controlling the trunk segment’s backward lean movement. Obesity therefore most likely influences ability to recover from slips. Interventions must be aimed at balance recovery among individuals with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Comparison of factors between elderly fall groups receiving home care

18/01/2017

Source: Asian Nursing Research, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: December 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The purpose of this study was to provide information to develop a program to prevent repeated falls by analyzing the difference in gait, muscle strength, balance, and fear of falling according to their fall experience. The study suggests that intervention program should be tailored to fall risk factors to enhance gait and balance and lower body muscle strength and reduce the fear of falling to prevent repeated incidences of falls in this population.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Strength or power, which is more important to prevent slip-related falls?

15/10/2015

Source: Human Movement Science, 2015, Vol 44  p. 192-200

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: December 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Both muscle strength and muscle power have been related to falls in older adults, and this study aimed to identify which is more important in preventing slip-related falls. Younger adults were chosen to participate in the study. Findings suggested that power could be more closely related to a slip fall. The findings could be used to provide guidance to identify individuals at increased risk of falling and design effective prevention training paradigms aimed at maximising muscle power among older adults and those with disabilities.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Emerging concept: ‘central benefit model’ of exercise in falls prevention

16/05/2013

Source: British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2013, 47 (2) p. 115-117

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are the third leading cause of chronic disability worldwide, and are not random events. They occur, at least in part, due to impaired balance or cognitive processes. There is evidence that targeting exercise is an effective intervention, the accepted dogma behind this being that improved physical function, balance and muscle strength underlies the effectiveness of the exercise in reducing falls. However, findings from RCTs suggest that exercise reduces falls via mechanisms other than improved physiological function: cognitive (eg executive) functions may be an important mechanism by which exercise reduces falls.

Length of publication: 2 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.