Effects of vibration training in reducing risk of slip-related falls among young adults with obesity

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study examined the effects of controlled whole-body vibration training on reducing risk of slip-related falls in obese people. Twenty-three young adults with obesity were randomly assigned into either the vibration or placebo group. Both groups were also exposed to a standardized slip induced by a treadmill during gait prior to and following the training. Dynamic stability and fall incidences responding to the slip were also assessed. The results indicated that vibration training significantly increased the muscle strength and improved dynamic stability control at recovery touchdown after the slip occurrence. Vibration-based training could be a promising alternative or additional modality to active exercise-based fall prevention programs for people with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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Effects of obesity in recovering stability after a treadmill slip

21/02/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effects of obesity on falls and dynamic stability control in young adults subjected to a standardized treadmill-induced gait-slip. Trials were categorized as a fall or recovery based on the reliance of the subject on external support following the slip. Compared with the normal-weight group, the obese group demonstrated less relative muscle strength and fell more after the slip. Obese people’s dynamic stability after slip was impaired possibly due to the inability of controlling the trunk segment’s backward lean movement. Obesity therefore most likely influences ability to recover from slips. Interventions must be aimed at balance recovery among individuals with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Body mass index, falls, and injurious falls among U.S. adults

19/10/2016

Source: Preventive Medicine, 2016, Vol 91 p. 217-223

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are an important health concern because they are associated with loss of independence and disability, particularly among women. This study determined the age- and sex-specific prevalence of injurious falls among adults in the United States and examined the impact of obesity on fall risk. Not only are mid-life women at high risk for falls, but the class II/III obesity is a risk factor for injurious falls. Targeting mid-life women for fall and injury prevention is an important aim for practitioners, particularly given unique correlates of falling for this group.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


More laboratory-induced slips occur among obese individuals

14/03/2016

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Slip falls can be serious, estimated to cause 40-50% of all fall related injuries. Epidemiological data indicates that older and obese adults experience more falls than young, non-obese individuals. This study investigated the effects of obesity and age on slip severity from laboratory-induced slips. Obesity did not affect slip distance, slip duration or peak slip speed, but obese individuals were more than eight times more likely to experience a fall than non-obese individuals when adjusting for certain factors. These results indicate that obesity may be a significant risk factor for experiencing slip-induced falls.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.