Knowledge, behavioural practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: implications for prevention programs

16/06/2017

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2017, Vol 72 p. 19-24

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September-October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls prevention has been well-studied, but the focus is usually on indoor falls rather than outdoor. Older adults’ knowledge of outdoor risk factors and fall prevention practices have not been examined. This study sought to fill that gap and inform the development of a prevention program by exploring experiences of older adults.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of an ICT-based fall-prevention system in community-dwelling older adults

16/06/2017

Source: International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 2017, Vol 106 p. 10-25

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A sedentary lifestyle and low levels of physical activity are major factors in fall risk for older adults. ICT-based interventions could possibly counteract the risk for this group, as studies show that such interventions significantly reduce it. However, this population is heterogeneous, and several factors (such as gender, age, fitness and others) may influence the use of these systems. This study analyses the iStoppFalls system, testing effectiveness and usage indicators, among other things.

Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Falls and fractures: consensus statement

17/03/2017

Source: Government website, 2017

Follow this link for the document

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Guidance

In a nutshell: Public Health England have published new guidance on falls and fractures around supporting commissioning for prevention. It outlines approaches to interventions and activities helping to prevent falls and fractures to improve health outcomes for older people


The degree of misjudgment between perceived and actual gait ability

19/12/2016

Source: Gait & posture, 2017, Vol 51 p. 275-280

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Carrying out motor tasks successfully means a person’s perception of their physical abilities must be integrated with a perception of the task itself. Geriatric decline in physical and cognitive abilities may lead to misjudgements and possibly errors leading to loss of balance. This study aimed to quantify how much older adults misjudge their actual gait ability. Better abilities did not appear to be associated with better judgement – in fact, a range of misjudgements showed. This could provide insight into the interplay between cognition and physical abilities, and add value towards fall prevention and promotion of healthy ageing.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Alzheimer’s Disease Increases Fall-related Bone Fracture Hospitalization in Elderly Chinese

17/11/2016

Source: International Journal of Gerontology, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2016

Publicati0n type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Fall and fracture risks are higher for older adults with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) than for older adults without dementia. This study investigated AD relating to hospitalization due to fall-related bone fracture in elderly Chinese patients. The proportion of patients in the AD group hospitalized because of fall-related bone fracture was significantly higher than in the control group. AD may increase the incidence of hospitalization due to falls and bone fracture. Our findings suggest that preventing falls in AD patients may reduce the number of hospitalized AD patients.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Reducing older people’s falls in the general practice ProAct65+ trial

15/08/2016

Source: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2016, Volume 67 p. 46-54

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November-December 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common in older people in the UK and NHS costs associated with these falls are high. Systematic reviews suggest that home exercise and group-based interventions focusing on progressively challenging balance and increasing strength, can reduce up to 42% of falls in those with a history. ProAct65+ was a large RCT which investigated the effectiveness of a home exercise programme and a group-based exercise programme compared to usual care. Home exercise appeared less effective than group exercise, but the latter also became less effective after 24 months if the exercise did not continue.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The characteristics of walking strategy in elderly patients with diabetes

21/06/2016

Source: International Journal of Nursing Sciences, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study explored the walking strategy by monitoring the characteristics of centre of pressure (COP) of gait in the elderly with type2 diabetes. It puts forward the walking strategy according to the abnormal COP trajectory. Since elderly people with diabetes have a high risk of falling, the rehabilitation nursing should be strengthened to include the training of enhancing proprioception to prevent these patients with type 2 diabetes from falling.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Libary for the full text of the article. Followi this link to find your local NHS Library.


A comprehensive fracture prevention strategy in older adults

21/06/2016

Source: European Geriatric Medicine, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2016

Publiaction type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest group on falls and fracture prevention of the European union geriatric medicine society (EUGMS), outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people.

Length of publication: 1 page

Somwe important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Developing predictive models for fear of falling from posturography parameters

21/06/2016

Source: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 2016, Vol 54 p. 131-138

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of Publication: July 2016

Publication type:Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls pose an important problem for older adults. Balance training is one of the main prevention strategies, but there is a lack of objective measurement methods that would allow the effectiveness of the treatments employed to be assessed. This study aimed to analyse the relationship between posturographic parameters and risk factors associated with falling, including the fear of falling (FoF). Posturography can be used as an assessment tool to analyse the effects of those treatments aimed at preventing falls.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients

21/04/2016

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient falls within hospitals are mainly preventable, but are a serious source of incidents among older patients. This study seeks to identify possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls, which is lacking in literature, such as patient motions, environmental design factors in bathrooms, and clinician zones in a patient’s room. Results suggest that only motion-related factors contribute significantly to falls in the bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute in the clinician zone. Future work includes updating environmental design factors associated with these motions in a patient’s room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A health improvement programme for older people’s QOL after falls

21/04/2016

Source: Polish Annals of Medicine, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls in elderly people can cause both physical and mental injury, and have major medical and financial implications. This study aimed to assess the predisposition to falling as well as the subjective evaluation of quality of life in the elderly after implementation of the fall prevention programme. Slipping at home was the most frequent cause of falling. Patients who completed the programme showed improvements in all the analyzed aspects, especially in activities of daily living and the level of pain. A health improvement exercise programme reduces falls and can improve quality of life in elderly people.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Patient perceptions with falls during hospitalization and after discharge

14/03/2016

Source: Applied Nursing Research, 2016, Vol 31 p. 79-85

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aims to describe the perceptions of hospitalised older people around their falls risk and fall prevention strategies received while hospitalised, and any instructions they received to prevent possible falls after discharge.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Fall risk assessment: retrospective analysis of Morse Fall Scale scores

14/03/2016

Source: Applied Nursing Research, 2016, Vol 31 p. 34-40

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The Morse Fall Scale is used in several care settings for fall risk assessment and supports the implementation of preventive nursing interventions. This study aims to analyse its scores to compare patient characteristics, diagnoses and lengths of stay, looking at elderly female patients in Portugal. There were no statistical differences in Morse Fall Scale score between the first and the last assessment.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Falls and Balance Impairments in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

16/02/2016

Source: Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 2016, Vol 40 no 1 p. 6-9

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Older adults with type 2 diabetes are far more likely to fall than those without, and the consequences of these falls include avoiding activity, gradual immobility and mortality. Balance is one of the most common risk factors, which is associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This is therefore the central focus of falls prevention research and interventions in these cases. But certain studies have found those without major complications of DPN to be at increased falls risk as well, associating with subtle declines in sensorimotor and cognitive function. Knowledge of this may help fall prevention strategies.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.