A hierarchical alarm model for elderly fall prevention sensors

17/05/2017

Source: Pervasive and Mobile Computing, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: New technologies allow for automatic monitoring of hospitalised older people, helping clinical staff to supervise to reduce falls. This paper introduces a hierarchical model to predict alarming states in a sensor worn over clothes. The hierarchy predicts levels of danger to warn clinical staff of possible fall danger.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to  find your local NHS Library.


Depressive symptomatology and fall risk among community-dwelling older adults

18/04/2017

Source: Social Science & Medicine, 2017, Vol 178 p. 206-213

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common among older adults and may be related to depressive symptoms (DS). With advancing age, there is an onset of chronic conditions, sensory impairments, and activity limitations that are associated with falls and with depressive disorders. Prior cross-sectional studies have observed significant associations between DS and subsequent falls as well as between fractures and subsequent clinical depression and DS. Using sophisticated methods and a large U.S. sample, this study found larger magnitudes of effect in the DS-falls relationship than in prior studies—highlighting the risk of falls for older adults with DS.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


East Lancs Falls Response Service…keeping 900 patients out of hospital

19/12/2016

Source: The Academy of NHS Fabulous Stuff

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: Website news article

In a nutshell: Based at Burnley Ambulance Station in East Lancashire, an Occupational Therapist (Rachel Bedwell) and North West Ambulance Service paramedic (Gail Smith) respond to 999 and 111 calls triaged as ‘Green code – Falls with no apparent injury’.

The Falls Response Service – a one-of-a-kind in England – has attended 1,272 calls in the past 18 months and the intervention of a qualified OT has kept over 70% of patients in their own home rather than being transported to A&E.

Length of publication: 1 page


The degree of misjudgment between perceived and actual gait ability

19/12/2016

Source: Gait & posture, 2017, Vol 51 p. 275-280

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Carrying out motor tasks successfully means a person’s perception of their physical abilities must be integrated with a perception of the task itself. Geriatric decline in physical and cognitive abilities may lead to misjudgements and possibly errors leading to loss of balance. This study aimed to quantify how much older adults misjudge their actual gait ability. Better abilities did not appear to be associated with better judgement – in fact, a range of misjudgements showed. This could provide insight into the interplay between cognition and physical abilities, and add value towards fall prevention and promotion of healthy ageing.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Preoperative Falls Predict Postoperative Falls, Functional Decline, and Surgical Complications

19/10/2016

Source: EBioMedicine, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common and linked to morbidity. This study’s objectives were to characterize postoperative falls, and determine whether preoperative falls independently predicted postoperative falls (primary outcome), functional dependence, quality of life, complications, and readmission. It concluded that falls are common after surgery, and preoperative falls herald postoperative falls and other adverse outcomes. A history of preoperative falls should be routinely ascertained.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Preventing falls for a person with dementia

15/08/2016

Source: Crisis Prevention Institute

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Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: Falls are a danger to a person with dementia, and a cause of alarm to family and professional caregivers. Wherever the person lives, and no matter what stage of dementia the person is living with, falls must—and can—be prevented due to their high-risk status and the difficulty associated with recovery. Evidence indicates that multifactorial approaches are beneficial. Collaborating with an occupational therapist (OT) trained in dementia care is essential, as they will discover the client’s cognitive level and focus on remaining abilities, as well as task modification, environmental adaptation and enhanced communication.

Length of publication: 1 page


Cross-cultural validation of the falls efficacy scale international in elderly

21/04/2016

Source: Journal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to describe the psychometric properties of cultural adaptations of the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) in the elderly dwelling in the community. It used a systematic literature review to look into the question. The FES-I is considered acceptable, understandable to measure the fear of falling in the elderly, valid, reliable and comparable cross—culturally, so it is recommended in rehabilitation research, clinical trials and practice, and in fall-prevention programmes in the elderly.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Patient perceptions with falls during hospitalization and after discharge

14/03/2016

Source: Applied Nursing Research, 2016, Vol 31 p. 79-85

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aims to describe the perceptions of hospitalised older people around their falls risk and fall prevention strategies received while hospitalised, and any instructions they received to prevent possible falls after discharge.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Temporal trends in falls cases seen by EMS in Melbourne

16/12/2015

Source: Injury, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Injury due to falls is a major public health problem, especially for older people. This study aimed to compare the relative accuracies of ambulance call taker triage compared to paramedic assessment, and work out temporal trends and variations in demand for falls cases over time and by residence type for older adults. Using data from call takers may underestimate the incidence of falls compared to using paramedic case records by up to 13%. Temporal patterns can inform ambulance service policy and practice, falls referral and prevention programmes to optimise service delivery which will lessen the number of future falls cases.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Unintentional injuries treated in emergency departments among older people

16/12/2015

Source: Journal of Safety Research, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: December 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: In the USA, unintentional injuries among older adults, and especially falls-related injuries, are an increasing public health concern. In 2011, 65% of these injuries were due to falls, which increased with age and peaked at the ≥ 100 age group. Prevention efforts to reduce falls and resulting injuries among adults aged ≥ 65 years have the potential to increase well-being and reduce health care spending. Increasing knowledge about fall risk factors and broadly disseminating evidence-based injury and fall prevention programs in both clinical and community settings must be priorities.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full ext of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Physios and OTs promote falls prevention

17/11/2015

Source: Chartered Society of Physiotherapists

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Date of publication: November 2015

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: Physio and occupational therapy staff teamed up at Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust to provide general awareness of falls and factors that can reduce risk of falls. Patients, relatives and hospital visitors received CSP and Age UK leaflets, explaining how to ‘fall-proof’ a home and improve strength and balance through exercising, and in addition, staff checked walking aids and, where necessary, changed the ferrules, or rubber caps, on the ends of walking aids.

Length of publication: 1 page


Diabetes mellitus end-organ damage as falls risk in hip fracture

10/07/2015

Source: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 2015, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to identify differential characteristics of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) complicated by end-organ damage who experience a fall-related hip fracture. It showed that a significant amount of patients with clinical evidence of end-organ damage due to T2DM who experience a fall-related hip fracture have a history of recurrent falling in the previous year. These patients should be identified and offered preventive actions aimed at reducing their risk of falling.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Fall prevention and bathroom safety in the epilepsy monitoring unit

10/07/2015

Source: Epilepsy and Behavior, 2015, Vol 48 p. 75-78

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: July 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are one of the most common adverse events in the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) and can results in significant injury. Fall reductions procedures vary between institutions because it is not known which interventions are most effective. This study examined falls and the impact of strategy changes at one institution. Incidents occurring in the bathroom were more likely to result in falls compared to elsewhere; frequency of falls decreased with patient education, hourly nurse rounds, bed alarms and other interventions. No specific intervention could be identified as being high impact.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Age-related differences in inter-joint coordination during stair walking transitions

15/06/2015

Source: Gait & Posture, 2015, Online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Using stairs can be difficult and hazardous as locomotor tasks for older people with fall incidents reported frequently. This study looked at inter-joint coordination to provide insights into age-related changes in neuromuscular control of gait that can inform prevention or intervention strategies. The findings suggest that normal aging adults have less independent control of adjacent joints compared to younger adults suggesting they have less flexibility to modulate inter-joints coordination appropriately during stair walking transitions.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.