Reducing falls can help trusts improve patient experience and reduce costs

17/08/2017

Source: NHS Improvement, 2017

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: This report from NHS Improvement provides a picture of the scale of inpatient falls and the benefits to the NHS if the rate in hospitals was reduced. It followed the successful completion of their collaboration between 19 trusts to adopt improvement methodologies and creating a learning community to discuss changes. Results include the observation that older patients represent 77% of total falls, but 87% of total costs – reducing this group by around 25-30% could result in annual savings of up to £170m.

Length of publication: 1 page


The effectiveness of intervention programs for preventing patients from falls

16/06/2017

Source: Kontakt, 2017, online

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This is a review article to summarise the conclusions of different studies about the effectiveness of hospital fall prevention programmes from the last five years. Twelve studies made it into the final review, and the most mentioned strategy was education of patients and staff. Effectiveness depends on factors like compliance, leadership, team training and IT support, amongst others.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Dopamine depletion in Parkinsons alters brain processing, impairing gait automaticity

18/04/2017

Source: NeuroImage, 2017, Vol 152 p. 207-220

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Impairments in motor automaticity cause patients with Parkinson’s disease to rely on attentional resources during gait, resulting in greater motor variability and a higher risk of falls. Although dopaminergic circuitry is known to play an important role in motor automaticity, little evidence exists on the neural mechanisms underlying the breakdown of locomotor automaticity in Parkinson’s disease. Overall, this study demonstrates that dopamine ameliorates gait automaticity in Parkinson’s disease by altering striatal, limbic and cerebellar processing, thereby informing future therapeutic avenues for gait and falls prevention.

Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Preoperative Falls Predict Postoperative Falls, Functional Decline, and Surgical Complications

19/10/2016

Source: EBioMedicine, 2016, online

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common and linked to morbidity. This study’s objectives were to characterize postoperative falls, and determine whether preoperative falls independently predicted postoperative falls (primary outcome), functional dependence, quality of life, complications, and readmission. It concluded that falls are common after surgery, and preoperative falls herald postoperative falls and other adverse outcomes. A history of preoperative falls should be routinely ascertained.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


CSP launches updated Falls Prevention Economic Model online

15/09/2016

Source: Chartered Society of Physiotherapists, 2016, online

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Website news item

In a nutshell: The latest version of the Falls Prevention Economic Model, with fresh data and research, is now live on the CSP’s website. It shows that across the UK there is potential to save 160,000 falls each year, equating to a cost saving of £25.2 million to NHS services. The CSP has produced a detailed guide to accompany the relaunched model. The guide includes examples of people using the model and is also available on the society’s website.

Length of publication: 1 page


The characteristics of walking strategy in elderly patients with diabetes

21/06/2016

Source: International Journal of Nursing Sciences, 2016, online

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Date of publication: May 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study explored the walking strategy by monitoring the characteristics of centre of pressure (COP) of gait in the elderly with type2 diabetes. It puts forward the walking strategy according to the abnormal COP trajectory. Since elderly people with diabetes have a high risk of falling, the rehabilitation nursing should be strengthened to include the training of enhancing proprioception to prevent these patients with type 2 diabetes from falling.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Libary for the full text of the article. Followi this link to find your local NHS Library.


Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients

21/04/2016

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2016, online

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patient falls within hospitals are mainly preventable, but are a serious source of incidents among older patients. This study seeks to identify possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls, which is lacking in literature, such as patient motions, environmental design factors in bathrooms, and clinician zones in a patient’s room. Results suggest that only motion-related factors contribute significantly to falls in the bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute in the clinician zone. Future work includes updating environmental design factors associated with these motions in a patient’s room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A health improvement programme for older people’s QOL after falls

21/04/2016

Source: Polish Annals of Medicine, 2016, online

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls in elderly people can cause both physical and mental injury, and have major medical and financial implications. This study aimed to assess the predisposition to falling as well as the subjective evaluation of quality of life in the elderly after implementation of the fall prevention programme. Slipping at home was the most frequent cause of falling. Patients who completed the programme showed improvements in all the analyzed aspects, especially in activities of daily living and the level of pain. A health improvement exercise programme reduces falls and can improve quality of life in elderly people.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Patient perceptions with falls during hospitalization and after discharge

14/03/2016

Source: Applied Nursing Research, 2016, Vol 31 p. 79-85

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aims to describe the perceptions of hospitalised older people around their falls risk and fall prevention strategies received while hospitalised, and any instructions they received to prevent possible falls after discharge.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


More laboratory-induced slips occur among obese individuals

14/03/2016

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2016, online

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Slip falls can be serious, estimated to cause 40-50% of all fall related injuries. Epidemiological data indicates that older and obese adults experience more falls than young, non-obese individuals. This study investigated the effects of obesity and age on slip severity from laboratory-induced slips. Obesity did not affect slip distance, slip duration or peak slip speed, but obese individuals were more than eight times more likely to experience a fall than non-obese individuals when adjusting for certain factors. These results indicate that obesity may be a significant risk factor for experiencing slip-induced falls.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A study on floor wear development: Impact on slip-resistance performance

16/12/2015

Source: Tribology International, 2016, Vol 95 p. 316-323

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looked into the dynamics of wear and tear to pedestrian walkways to understand how wear develops and its impacts on slip-resistant performance. Friction tests were conducted and both qualitative and quantitative investigations carried out by surface analysis and microscopic observation. Changes to the surface were caused by direct and indirect wear which significantly affected slip-resistant function. The study may have potential applications for design improvements of floors and walkways to prevent slip and fall incidents.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow thi slink to find your local NHS Library.


Elderly fall patients triaged to the trauma bay

16/09/2015

Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 2015, online

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Date of publication: July 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This is a retrospective study looking into falls in the elderly as being a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, to better categorise the patient population and describe factors contributing to their falling. It was carried out at a community trauma centre in geriatric patients who had been triaged to the trauma bay between 2005 and 2013, researching intake paperwork to assess the fall and discharge summaries to determine outcomes. It concluded most severe injuries occur at home, and so prevention measures should be aimed at this setting. Very elderly patients may be at increased risk for intracranial fall-related injuries.

Length of publication: 18 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Leisure-Time Physical Activity, Falls, and Fall Injuries in Middle-Aged Adults

16/09/2015

Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2015, online

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Date of publication: July 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Exercise and strength training has been shown to protect older adults, aged 65+, against falls, but evidence is lacking for the role of physical activity during leisure time for middle-aged adults. This means falls tend to be more prevalent and are more likely to result in injury. This study investigated the association between self-reported engagement in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and the frequency of falls and fall-related injuries in middle-aged and older adults.

Length of publication: 1 page


16th International Falls and Postural Stability Conference 11th September 2015

10/07/2015

Source: ProFaNE website

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Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: This annual event is widely recognised as the leading meeting in the UK for clinicians working in the field of falls and mobility medicine. The day provides a forum for scientific discussion and clinical updates and enables a multidisciplinary audience of over 200 professionals to share their experiences of best clinical practice.

Length of publication: 1 page