Diabetes, arthritis, urinary incontinence, poor self‐rated health, higher body mass index and lower handgrip strength are associated with falls among community‐dwelling middle‐aged and older adults: Pooled analyses from two cross‐sectional Malaysian datasets

22/08/2019

Source: Geriatrics and Gerontology International

Follow this link for the abstract 

Date of publication: Vol. 19 Iss. 8 2019, pps. 798 -803

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The identification of risk factors associated with comorbidities and physical fitness might provide pathways for planning therapeutic targets for future falls prevention. Results from large datasets that examined falls risk factors in Asia have been limited. The aim of the present study was to identify the risk factors for falls by pooling data consisting of medical history, physical performance and self‐rated health from two large Malaysian epidemiological studies.

 Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Does aquatic exercise improve commonly reported predisposing risk factors to falls within the elderly? A systematic review

08/04/2019

Source: BMC, research in progress

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Date of publication: 22nd February 2019, Vol. 19 iss. 52, pps. 1-16

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: According to the World Health Organization, the elderly are at the highest risk of injury or death from a fall. Age-related changes in strength, balance and flexibility are degenerative factors that may increase the risk of falling, and an aquatic training may offer a favourable environment to improve these modifiable risk factors.

 Length of publication: 16 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Falls in the geriatric patient

26/10/2018

Source: Clinics in Geriatric Medicine

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Date of publication: October 2018

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls in older adults are multifaceted, and are caused by biologic, behavioral, environmental, and socioeconomic risk factors. An estimated 25% of older adults fall each year. With 10,000 people turning 65 each day, it is essential that those at highest risk receive intervention to decrease the risk and rate of falls. In addition, those older adults at lower risk still need to understand the risk of falls and be educated about maintaining healthy lifestyles. Fall risk assessment and referral to individualized or group-based programming can reduce fall risks and falls.

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Discussion of fall prevention approaches with older adult patients

05/03/2018

Source: Preventive Medicine Reports, 2018, Vol 9 p. 149-152

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries among older adults. The American and British Geriatric Societies recommend a fall risk assessment to identify risk factors and guide interventions to prevent these falls. This study describes the self-reported discussion of fall prevention approaches used by primary care providers (PCPs) who treat older adults. Self-reported discussion of any fall prevention approaches was 89.3%. Controlling for provider and practice characteristics, there were significant differences by provider type. Fall prevention suggestions vary by type of PCP. Dissemination of geriatric guidelines should include all PCPs who routinely see older adults.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Evaluation of organisational change to reduce fall and other injuries

19/12/2017

Source: Applied Ergonomics, 2018, Volume 68 p. 42-53

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Date of publication: April 2018

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Long term care workers are at significant risk for occupation-related injuries. This study sought to evaluate the implementation process of a participatory change programme to reduce risk. Process evaluation revealed idiosyncratic approaches to recruitment and related challenges of reaching staff. Solutions to prioritized hazards were developed and implemented, despite time challenges. The iterative solution development approach was embraced. Program fidelity was considered good despite early program time demands. Post implementation reports revealed sustained hazard identification and solution development.

Length of publication: 11 pages

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Impaired perceived timing of falls in the elderly

19/12/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2018, Vol 59 p. 40-45

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Date of publication: January 2018

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are the leading cause of injury-related deaths and hospitalizations, with older adults at an increased risk. As humans age, physical changes and health conditions make falls more likely. The body reflexively responds to prevent injury during a fall, though little is known of the perception of this response. Younger and older people were compared for their perceptions of time during a fall: older people’s fall perception was found to be nearly twice as slow. It is possible that such age-related differences in fall perception may relate to increased falls rates in older adults.

Length of publication: 5 pages

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Fall risk in women over 50 after distal radius fracture

19/12/2017

Source: Journal of Hand Therapy, 2017, online

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Date of publication: November 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The purpose of this study was to determine changes in overall functional status over the first year after a Distal Radial Fracture in women aged 50 years and older. Seventy-eight women were assessed for balance, balance confidence, lower extremity strength, gait speed, fall history, physical activity levels, and self-reported wrist pain and function at intervals after DRF. Groups of participants aged 50-65 years and 65 years and older were compared. Both groups had the same pattern of recovery, though the older group has a lower functional status which can lead to fall risk.

Length of publication: 1 page

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Quick adjustments during gait are less accurate through focal cerebellar lesions

17/10/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017, Volume 58 p. 390-393

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Online gait corrections are frequently used to restore gait stability and prevent falling. They require shorter response times than voluntary movements which suggests that subcortical pathways contribute to the execution of online gait corrections. To evaluate the cerebellum in these pathways two hypotheses were tested around accuracy of online gait corrections and the pronouncement of differences. The reduced ability to accurately adjust foot placement during walking in individuals with focal cerebellar lesions appears to be a general movement control deficit, which could contribute to increased fall risk.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.