Investigation of floor surface finishes for optimal slip resistance performance

14/07/2017

Source: Health and Safety at Work, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Increasing slip resistance of the floor surface would be desirable, but there is a lack of evidence as to whether traction properties are linearly correlated with topographic features of floor surfaces or what scales of surface roughness are required to effectively control slipperiness of the floor. The results of this study with previous findings confirm that floor surface finishes require different levels of surface coarseness for different types of environmental conditions to effectively manage slippery walking environments.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A study on floor wear development: Impact on slip-resistance performance

16/12/2015

Source: Tribology International, 2016, Vol 95 p. 316-323

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study looked into the dynamics of wear and tear to pedestrian walkways to understand how wear develops and its impacts on slip-resistant performance. Friction tests were conducted and both qualitative and quantitative investigations carried out by surface analysis and microscopic observation. Changes to the surface were caused by direct and indirect wear which significantly affected slip-resistant function. The study may have potential applications for design improvements of floors and walkways to prevent slip and fall incidents.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow thi slink to find your local NHS Library.


Investigating floor surface roughness to prevent slips and falls

18/10/2012

Source: Applied Ergonomics, 2013, 44 (1) p. 58-64

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: It is known that slip resistance performance improves with floor surface roughness. However, the question remains as to whether this correlates in a linear way with surface topographies, and what roughness levels are required for effective slip resistance, including in wet or dry conditions. Findings from this study may impact on floor designs for reducing fall hazards.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.