Investigation of floor surface finishes for optimal slip resistance performance

14/07/2017

Source: Health and Safety at Work, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Increasing slip resistance of the floor surface would be desirable, but there is a lack of evidence as to whether traction properties are linearly correlated with topographic features of floor surfaces or what scales of surface roughness are required to effectively control slipperiness of the floor. The results of this study with previous findings confirm that floor surface finishes require different levels of surface coarseness for different types of environmental conditions to effectively manage slippery walking environments.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of obesity in recovering stability after a treadmill slip

21/02/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effects of obesity on falls and dynamic stability control in young adults subjected to a standardized treadmill-induced gait-slip. Trials were categorized as a fall or recovery based on the reliance of the subject on external support following the slip. Compared with the normal-weight group, the obese group demonstrated less relative muscle strength and fell more after the slip. Obese people’s dynamic stability after slip was impaired possibly due to the inability of controlling the trunk segment’s backward lean movement. Obesity therefore most likely influences ability to recover from slips. Interventions must be aimed at balance recovery among individuals with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Strength or power, which is more important to prevent slip-related falls?

15/10/2015

Source: Human Movement Science, 2015, Vol 44  p. 192-200

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: December 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Both muscle strength and muscle power have been related to falls in older adults, and this study aimed to identify which is more important in preventing slip-related falls. Younger adults were chosen to participate in the study. Findings suggested that power could be more closely related to a slip fall. The findings could be used to provide guidance to identify individuals at increased risk of falling and design effective prevention training paradigms aimed at maximising muscle power among older adults and those with disabilities.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Rubber outsole with hybrid surface pattern for preventing icy slips

15/06/2015

Source: Applied Ergonomics, 2015, Vol 51 p. 9-17

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Conventional winter footwear can be effective in preventing slips on icy surfaces, but the protruding studs can also be dangerous and lead to trips instead. A new hybrid rubber outsole containing both rough and smooth parts was designed to provide high slip resistance with any protrusions. Results indicate these were comparable to conventional anti-slip footwear which could contribute to a decrease in fall accidents, but further research is need to confirm effectiveness under a wide range of test conditions.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.