Tai chi to prevent falls in older adults

03/12/2019

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing

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Date of publication: November 2019, Vol. 24, iss. 11 pps. 550-552

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Frailty is common in older age and those living with frailty are at risk of adverse health outcomes. Exercise programmes could potentially reduce the risks for this group of people by increasing muscle strength, reducing falls and improving overall mobility. This study looks specifically at the effects of weekly tai chi classes in those people living with frailty in older age. This study monitored the participants who attended each week and looked to see if any improvements were made by reducing the risk of falls, and improving mobility. Validated tools that assess balance, gait, and identify falls risk were used throughout the study. Initial results indicate a perceived improvement in physical health and wellbeing.

 Length of publication: three pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Workshops help seniors with balance, fall prevention

18/01/2019

Source: Fort Myers Florida Weekly

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Date of publication: 19 December 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: To help seniors prevent falls, a leading cause of fatal injuries, the Area Agency on Aging for Southwest Florida is offering free balance and falls prevention programs in January.

Length of publication: One page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Effective healthcare training of Tai Chi fall prevention program for elderly people

21/09/2018

Source: Journal of Medical Imaging and Health Informatics

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Date of publication: August 2018, Vol. 8, Number 6, pps. 1258-1261

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Tai Chi Fall Prevention Program Effects on The Physical and Psychological Risk Factors of Elderly Falls.

 Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Using Tai Chi to reduce fall risk factors among older adults: an evaluation of a community-based implementation

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of Applied Gerontology

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Date of publication: 11th April 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to evaluate a community-based implementation of an evidence-based fall prevention program, in which 131 individuals participated in Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance. Self-report and functional performance assessments included demographics, health and fall history, the Activities-Specific Balance Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Functional Reach test. Pre–post scores were compared with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The mostly female participants were 73 years old, on average. At baseline, 18% reported being afraid or very afraid of falling, and 18% had fallen in the past 6 months. At follow-up, there was significant improvement in Timed Up and Go (p < .001), Functional Reach (p < .01), and Activities-Specific Balance Scale scores (p < .01). These results demonstrate that a 12-week evidence-based Tai Chi program can be feasibly implemented by novice instructors, is well-received by older adults, and can effectively reduce fall risk when implemented in community settings.

 Length of publication: 17 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Health benefits of tai chi: what is the evidence?

19/12/2016

Source: Canadian Family Physician 

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Date of publication: November 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article summarizes the benefits of tai chi in various conditions including falls.

 Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Multicomponent training improves balance, strength in type 2 diabetes, peripheral neuropathy

17/11/2016

Source: Endocrine Today

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Date of publication: October 17, 2016

 Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A targeted multicomponent program that includes functional strengthening exercises, walking, aerobics or tai chi can improve balance and strength for adults with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, but long-term data are insufficient to determine whether any improvements reduce the risk for falls, according to researchers.

 Length of publication: One page


An evidence map of the effect of Tai Chi on health outcomes

15/09/2016

Source: Systematic Reviews

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Date of publication: 27 July 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This evidence map describes the volume and focus of Tai Chi research reporting health outcomes. Originally developed as a martial art, Tai Chi is typically taught as a series of slow, low-impact movements that integrate the breath, mind, and physical activity to achieve greater awareness and a sense of well-being.

 Length of publication: 11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Effect of Tai Chi exercise on fall prevention in older adults: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

15/09/2016

Source: International Journal of Gerontology

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Date of publication: 5 August 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls among the elderly is a major public health concern. Tai Chi exercise appears to prevent the risk of falls among the elderly. Previous reviews found that there is insufficient evidence to conclude whether Tai Chi is effective in fall prevention. This review was performed to update the current evidence on the effect of this intervention.

 Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.