Effects of obesity in recovering stability after a treadmill slip

21/02/2017

Source: Journal of Biomechanics, 2017, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the effects of obesity on falls and dynamic stability control in young adults subjected to a standardized treadmill-induced gait-slip. Trials were categorized as a fall or recovery based on the reliance of the subject on external support following the slip. Compared with the normal-weight group, the obese group demonstrated less relative muscle strength and fell more after the slip. Obese people’s dynamic stability after slip was impaired possibly due to the inability of controlling the trunk segment’s backward lean movement. Obesity therefore most likely influences ability to recover from slips. Interventions must be aimed at balance recovery among individuals with obesity.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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Adaptive gait responses to an impending fall during treadmill walking

19/10/2016

Source: Gait and Posture, 2016, online

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Humans have been shown to adapt their gait when aware of potential slip risks when walking, though it is unknown if these adaptations also happen on a treadmill. This study sought investigate this possibility. It found that humans do adapt their gait when aware of possible risks compared to normal walking, by taking shorter steps and flattening their feet on impact, as well as repositioning their body centre. This could provide insights into dynamic stability control when individuals anticipate potential slip risk when treadmill walking.

Length of publication: 23 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.