Falls Prevention Scanning Bulletin Volume 11 Issue 1

14/11/2022

Role of vitamin D supplementation in the management of musculoskeletal diseases: update from an European Society of Clinical and Economical Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) working group

14/11/2022

Source: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 26 October 2022

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Vitamin D is a key component for optimal growth and for calcium–phosphate homeostasis. Skin photosynthesis is the main source of vitamin D. Limited sun exposure and insufficient dietary vitamin D supply justify vitamin D supplementation in certain age groups. In older adults, recommended doses for vitamin D supplementation vary between 200 and 2000 IU/day, to achieve a goal of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (calcifediol) of at least 50 nmol/L. The target level depends on the population being supplemented, the assessed system, and the outcome. Several recent large randomized trials with oral vitamin D regimens varying between 2000 and 100,000 IU/month and mostly conducted in vitamin D-replete and healthy individuals have failed to detect any efficacy of these approaches for the prevention of fracture and falls. Considering the well-recognized major musculoskeletal disorders associated with severe vitamin D deficiency and taking into account a possible biphasic effects of vitamin D on fracture and fall risks, an European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) working group convened, carefully reviewed, and analyzed the meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials on the effects of vitamin D on fracture risk, falls or osteoarthritis, and came to the conclusion that 1000 IU daily should be recommended in patients at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. The group also addressed the identification of patients possibly benefitting from a vitamin D loading dose to achieve early 25-hydroxyvitamin D therapeutic level or from calcifediol administration.

 Length of publication: 21 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

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The relationship between fear of falling and functional ability following a multi-component fall prevention program: an analysis of clinical data

14/11/2022

Source: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 28 October 2022

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The first objective was to evaluate clinical data from a multi-component fall prevention program. The second objective was to explore the relationship between physical function and fear of falling (FoF)

 Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Older adults benefit from following physical activity guidelines, new evidence shows

14/11/2022

Source: McKnights Long-Term care News

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Date of publication: 1 November 2022

 Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Adults aged 65 years and older who follow physical activity guidelines recommended for their age group have a lower risk of all-cause mortality, a new study finds.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The effect of ageing on between-limb centre of pressure coordination in standing balance: Is there evidence for reactive control challenges among older adults?

14/11/2022

Source: Human Movement Science

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: December 2022, Vol. 86

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Interlimb temporal synchrony and spatial symmetry of centre of pressure (COP) displacements may be vital contributors to standing balance control. In previous work among stroke survivors, low-frequency COP displacements (< 0.4 Hz) were proposed to arise from centre of mass (COM) dynamics, or from proactive exploratory processes. COP displacements among higher frequencies (>0.4 Hz), in contrast, have been attributed to corrective balance responses to internal perturbations. The present study extends this work to explore age-related alterations in such stability control processes during standing balance. 

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Cost effectiveness of fall prevention programmes for older adults

14/11/2022

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 3 November 2022, Vol. 27 Iss. 11

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are associated with a substantial increase in risk of mortality and are the second leading cause of unintentional death worldwide. A single fall can affect all aspects of an older person’s life. These broad impacts can lead to worse disability outcomes and a higher likelihood of long-term nursing home admission. There is a need to identify not just effective falls prevention interventions but also cost effectiveness.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Review of National Council on Aging Fall Prevention Programs for the Home Health Setting

14/11/2022

Source: Home Healthcare Now

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November/December 2022. Vol. 40 Iss. 6 pps. 337-342

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are a major concern for community-dwelling older adults and receive substantial attention from community agencies, clinicians, and researchers. A review process completed by the Administration for Community Living has identified 16 evidence-based fall prevention programs listed by the National Council on Aging. Although most of the programs are designed for group settings in the community, four have evidence supporting their effectiveness in the home setting. These are CAPABLE, FallScape, FallsTalk, and the Otago Exercise Program. We reviewed the literature about these four programs and identified positive outcomes in addition to reduction in fall risk. Although the results varied among the programs, potential benefits include improvement in activities of daily living, decreased Medicare expenditure, increased fall awareness and implementation of behaviors to reduce fall risk, decreased pain, and improved balance. These factors should be considered by community agencies looking to select programs to address falls for older adults.

 Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Further dissemination

14/11/2022

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