Falls Prevention Scanning Bulletin Volume 9 Issue 12

29/01/2021

Are the recommended physical activity guidelines practical and realistic for older people with complex medical issues?

29/01/2021

Source: Geriatric Physical Therapy

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January/March 2021 – Volume 44 – Issue 1 – pps 2-8

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The world population is aging. With increased life expectancy comes increased risk of major health problems that affect the health and well-being of older adults. Adequate levels of physical activity as specified by current global guidelines can reduce the risk of health problems in older adults. However, fewer than half of older adults are sufficiently active, and thus are unlikely to achieve these health benefits. Older adults living in residential aged care are even more sedentary, with multiple health issues and comorbidities. While meeting physical activity guidelines confers the greatest benefit for physical function, the practicality of adherence to these guidelines for older people who are not healthy and have complex medical issues is questionable. This special interest paper discusses research evidence on the topic of physical activity for older people across the health spectrum, with and without multiple comorbidities. This discussion is informed by professional experience, and suggests practical recommendations to positively impact physical activity engagement in the older adult population.

Length of publication 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Stepping out: a novel pilot falls prevention program for individuals with mild cognitive impairment

29/01/2021

Source: Innovation in Aging

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: Volume 4, Supplement 1, 2020, p. 485

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are the leading source of accidental injury and hospitalization among adults over the age of 65. Relative to people with intact cognition, individuals with cognitive impairment are at increased risk for falls; however, few falls prevention programs exist to specifically reduce and prevent falls in this population. To address this issue, we developed a novel, multifactorial, cognitively-based falls prevention program, Stepping Out. Based on the popular and effective evidenced-based program, Stepping On, Stepping Out was modified and tailored to the learning needs of individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). We hypothesized that older adults with MCI would find the program understandable, and that program participants would demonstrate reduced falls.

 Length of publication: One page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Home safety evaluation model for older adults with recurrent falls

29/01/2021

Source: Innovation in Aging

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: Volume 4, Supplement 1, 2020, Page 265

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Recurrent falls are a major threat in older adults. Home environment can be a hazard, but it is potentially modifiable/reversible. In Miami VA, occupational therapists conduct home safety evaluations (HSE) to ascertain the need for modifications to reduce falls risk. We reviewed the cohort of high-risk, recurrent falls patients evaluated at our Falls Prevention Clinic (FPC) between August 2017 to November 2019, to evaluate the impact of HSE. We identified 48 Veterans, age 76.5±6.9 years, of whom 15 (31.3%) reported 1-2 falls/year, 18 (37.5%) reported 3-4 falls/year, and 15 (31.3%) reported ≥5 falls/year. Twenty-eight (58.3%) were offered a HSE. Within these subjects, 74.2% reported falling at least once within their home, 43.8% had fear of falling, 5 (17.9%) had a history of substance or alcohol abuse. We observed that 29 (60.4%) would benefit from the addition of grab bars and 26 (54.2%) could benefit from toilet adjustments. Twelve (25.0%) were recommended to install bed rails. Only 15 (31.3%) Veterans agreed to all recommendations, 25 (52.1%) declined due to preference, and 8 (16.7%) declined for other reasons. Only 8 (16.7%) of these Veterans lived alone. Another factor is that 11 (22.9%) Veterans were renting and 32 (66.7%) owned their homes. Addressing and improving environmental hazards may ameliorate the risk for recurrent falls. Our next steps are to evaluate the extent of home modifications, and the long-term changes in falls/year. Further research needs to determine the long-term efficacy and cost-effectiveness of HSE, and how it can be more accessible to the community.

 Length of publication: One page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Outdoor falls prevention strategy use and neighborhood walkability among naturally occurring retirement community residents

29/01/2021

Source: Health Education & Behavior

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 24 December 2020

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Outdoor falls present a significant challenge to the health and well-being of older adults. Safe strategy use is an important component of falls prevention, yet little is known regarding use of outdoor falls prevention strategies.

The aim of this study is to examine outdoor falls prevention strategy use among naturally occurring retirement community residents at risk for falls, and to examine associations with neighborhood walkability.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Older adults’ experiences with the visual physio-feedback technology and peer-led combined group and home-based exercises

29/01/2021

Source: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: December 2020, pps. 1-8

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to explore older adults’ experience with an in-home physio-feedback and exercise program and explore whether the physio-feedback and exercise program intervention influenced their physical activity adherence. 

 Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The effect of telehealth interventions on function and quality of life for older adults with pre-frailty or frailty: a systematic review and meta-analysis

29/01/2021

Source: Journal of Applied Gerontology

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 6 January 2021

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Telehealth interventions improve health outcomes by increasing access to care. We conducted a systematic review to synthesize evidence on the effect of telehealth interventions compared with no intervention or usual care for older adults with pre-frailty or frailty for physical function, quality of life (QOL), and frailty.

 Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Further dissemination

29/01/2021


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