Falls Prevention Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 9 Issue 3

03/12/2019

Tai chi to prevent falls in older adults

03/12/2019

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November 2019, Vol. 24, iss. 11 pps. 550-552

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Frailty is common in older age and those living with frailty are at risk of adverse health outcomes. Exercise programmes could potentially reduce the risks for this group of people by increasing muscle strength, reducing falls and improving overall mobility. This study looks specifically at the effects of weekly tai chi classes in those people living with frailty in older age. This study monitored the participants who attended each week and looked to see if any improvements were made by reducing the risk of falls, and improving mobility. Validated tools that assess balance, gait, and identify falls risk were used throughout the study. Initial results indicate a perceived improvement in physical health and wellbeing.

 Length of publication: three pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Fall prevention in primary care using chronic disease management plans: A process evaluation of provider and consumer perspectives

03/12/2019

Source:Australian Occupational Therapy Journal

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 3 November 2019

 Publication type: Journal article 

In a nutshell:Falls are an important issue in primary care. General practitioners (GPs) are in a key position to identify older people at risk of falls on their caseload and put preventative plans into action. Chronic Disease Management (CDM) plans allow GPs to refer to allied health practitioners (AHPs) for evidence‐based falls interventions. A previous pilot study reduced falls risk factors using CDM pans with older people at risk of falls. This study aimed to conduct a process evaluation of how the intervention worked in the pilot study for providers and consumers.

 Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The association between chronic kidney disease, falls, and fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis

03/12/2019

Source: Osteoporosis International

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 12 November 2019

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are more likely to experience falls and fractures due to renal osteodystrophy and the high prevalence of risk factors for falls. However, it is not well established how great the risk is for falls and fractures for the different stages of CKD compared to the general population. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess whether, and in which degree, CKD was associated with falls and fractures in adults. A systematic search in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library was performed on 7 September 2018. All retrospective, cross-sectional, and longitudinal studies of adults (18 years of older) that studied the association between CKD, fractures, and falls were included. Additional studies were identified by cross-referencing.

 Length of publication: 17 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


‘False accountability’: The harmful consequences of bureaucratic rigour for aged care residents

03/12/2019

Source: Australian Journal of General Practice

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: November 2019

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Public outrage about the treatment of aged care residents in some nursing homes has its origins in a failure in each facility’s accountability framework. There is an overwhelming focus on documentation of organisational structures and care processes, detracting from what really matters – whether the wellbeing of residents has been achieved.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Strengthening family caregiving through innovative technology solutions

03/12/2019

Source: Innovations in Aging

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 3 November 2019

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Technology has the potential to enhance the repertoire of tools for family caregiving to address the complexities of caring for older adults. There are examples of technology-enabled interventions helping older adults remain independent and safe in their home; easing the financial, physical, and psychological challenges of family caregiving; assisting in the management of chronic illness; improving socialization and support; offering information and resources on a “just in time” basis; and improving the quality of care and quality of life for both older adults and their family caregivers. This session will review eight evidence-based, technology-enabled solutions for family caregivers, including technology solutions that address medication adherence, falls prevention, personal emergency response, remote monitoring, telehealth, dementia tracking, social engagement, and care training. Key drivers for successful application of these interventions (e.g., technology, analytics, user experience design) as well as barriers to scaling (e.g., accessibility, affordability, regulation) will be reviewed.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Root cause analysis of fall-related hospitalisations among residents of aged care services

03/12/2019

Source: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 14 November 2019

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Fall-related hospitalisations from residential aged care services (RACS) are distressing for residents and costly to the healthcare system. Strategies to limit hospitalisations include preventing injurious falls and avoiding hospital transfers when falls occur. The aims of this study is to undertake a root cause analysis (RCA) of fall-related hospitalisations from RACS and identify opportunities for fall prevention and hospital avoidance.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Further dissemination

03/12/2019

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