Reducing falls can help trusts improve patient experience and reduce costs

17/08/2017

Source: NHS Improvement, 2017

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: This report from NHS Improvement provides a picture of the scale of inpatient falls and the benefits to the NHS if the rate in hospitals was reduced. It followed the successful completion of their collaboration between 19 trusts to adopt improvement methodologies and creating a learning community to discuss changes. Results include the observation that older patients represent 77% of total falls, but 87% of total costs – reducing this group by around 25-30% could result in annual savings of up to £170m.

Length of publication: 1 page


Spinal mobility and alignment leading to lower QoL and falling

21/02/2017

Source: Gait & Posture, 2017, Volume 53 p. 98-103

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Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Spinal deformities can affect quality of life (QOL) and risk of falling, but no studies have explored the relationships of spinal mobility and sagittal alignment of spine and the lower extremities simultaneously. Purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship of those postural parameters to QOL and risk of falling. Forward-stooped posture and knee-flexion deformity could be important indicator of lower QOL. Moreover, limited extension in the lumbar spine could be a useful screening examination for fall prevention in the elderly.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effectiveness of falls prevention programs for reducing diabetic risk factors

17/11/2016

Source: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, 2016, online

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Date of publication: October 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that increases falls risk in the elderly. Prevention programs with a component of weight-bearing exercises are effective in decreasing future falls. However, weight-bearing exercise was only recently recommended in guidelines for exercise for these patients. There have since been many studies evaluating the effectiveness of such programs on this population. Evidence suggests that people with T2DM and DPN can improve their balance and walking after a targeted multicomponent program, though it is yet unknown whether they resulted in a decreased falls risk in the community.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contract your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Reducing inpatient falls in a 100% single room elderly care environment: evaluation of the impact of a systematic nurse training programme on falls risk assessment (FRA)

15/09/2016

Source: BMJ Quality Improvement Reports 

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Date of publication: 29th July 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The aim of the project is to reduce the incidence of IF and associated adverse clinical outcomes in a hospital with 100% single rooms.

 Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Cross-cultural validation of the falls efficacy scale international in elderly

21/04/2016

Source: Journal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2016, online

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to describe the psychometric properties of cultural adaptations of the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) in the elderly dwelling in the community. It used a systematic literature review to look into the question. The FES-I is considered acceptable, understandable to measure the fear of falling in the elderly, valid, reliable and comparable cross—culturally, so it is recommended in rehabilitation research, clinical trials and practice, and in fall-prevention programmes in the elderly.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Non-spatial memory influencing reach-grasp responses and loss of balance

16/02/2016

Source: Gait and Posture, 2016, Vol 45 p. 51-55

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Balance recovery after loss of balance is crucial to falls prevention, head trauma and other major injuries in older adults. When a fall occurs, little is known about the role of memory and attention shifting on the reach to grasp recovery strategy and what factors determine the response’s speed and precision beyond simple reaction time. Older adults were found demonstrate significantly increased movement time and grasping errors.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Video games for senior citizens to prevent falls

16/02/2016

Source: Trustech: the North West NHS innovation service

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: An innovation from Trafford Hospitals (CMFT) and the University of Manchester will help to reduce the number of falls in the older population. Exergames utilises Microsoft Kinect gaming technology to help improve strength, co-ordination and movement of its target users; elderly people at risk from falls.

Length of publication: 1 page


Temporal trends in falls cases seen by EMS in Melbourne

16/12/2015

Source: Injury, 2015, online

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Date of publication: November 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Injury due to falls is a major public health problem, especially for older people. This study aimed to compare the relative accuracies of ambulance call taker triage compared to paramedic assessment, and work out temporal trends and variations in demand for falls cases over time and by residence type for older adults. Using data from call takers may underestimate the incidence of falls compared to using paramedic case records by up to 13%. Temporal patterns can inform ambulance service policy and practice, falls referral and prevention programmes to optimise service delivery which will lessen the number of future falls cases.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Unintentional injuries treated in emergency departments among older people

16/12/2015

Source: Journal of Safety Research, 2015, online

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Date of publication: December 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: In the USA, unintentional injuries among older adults, and especially falls-related injuries, are an increasing public health concern. In 2011, 65% of these injuries were due to falls, which increased with age and peaked at the ≥ 100 age group. Prevention efforts to reduce falls and resulting injuries among adults aged ≥ 65 years have the potential to increase well-being and reduce health care spending. Increasing knowledge about fall risk factors and broadly disseminating evidence-based injury and fall prevention programs in both clinical and community settings must be priorities.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full ext of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Comparing induced and voluntary stepping postures to detect elderly fallers

17/11/2015

Source: Clinical Neurophysiology, 2015, online

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This paper reviews a physiological task predominant in preventing falls, while simultaneously challenging balance: taking a step. The voluntary step versus a step induced by an external and unpredictable perturbation are presented and compared. It focuses on the community-dwelling elderly population, discussing means of early detection of risk of falls, in order to prescribe an appropriate prevention. A working hypothesis is suggested on how “compensatory protective” steps are controlled and how their evaluation could bring additional information to the global balance assessment of risk of fall.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Pressure on health and social care is damaging prevention, says Age UK

17/11/2015

Source: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

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Date of publication: 22 October 2015

Publication type: News article

In a nutshell: The charity’s report on the health and care of older people in England says the failure to prevent the small problems faced by older people from becoming bigger ones is storing up difficulties for the future.

Length of publication: One page

 

 


TUMBLES falls prevention booklet

15/10/2015

Source: Profound

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: A booklet in Essex has been designed to support patients with self-help information on how to reduce their risk of falling as well as in care homes where staff can rethink how and why residents fall and look into changes to the environment to reduce falls risk.

Length of publication: 1 page


Factors contributing to falls in older adults and nursing implications

15/10/2015

Source: Geriatric Nursing, 2015, online

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are a common cause of serious injury and death in the older adult population, associated with multiple risks such as age, history of falls, impaired mobility, balance and gait problems, and medications. Sensory and environmental factors as well as the fear of falling may also increase the risk of falls. This article reviews current best practice on screening fall risks and fear of falling, fall prevention strategies, and fall prevention resources to assist gerontological nurses in reducing falls by their older adult clients.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A novel approach to physical inactivity in older age

16/09/2015

Source: Preventive Medicine Reports, 2015, Volume 2 p. 595-597

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Date of publication: July 2015 (online)

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Well-designed exercise can prevent falls in older people but according to previous research, general physical activity may increase falls. This study evaluated uptake and adherence to a physical activity promotion and falls prevention intervention among older people in the community, aged over 60 years.

Length of publication: 3 pages