Facilitators of attendance and adherence to group-based physical activity for older adults: a literature synthesis

16/06/2017

Source: Human Kinetic journals

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Date of publication: 2nd May 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This review examines program features that influence attendance and adherence to group-based physical activity (PA) by older adults.

Length of publication: 39 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Slow processing speed predicts falls in older adults with a falls history: 1-year prospective cohort study

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 

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Date of publication: 8 April 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A previous fall is a strong predictor of future falls. Recent epidemiologic data suggest that deficits in processing speed predict future injurious falls. Our primary objective was to determine a parsimonious predictive model of future falls among older adults who experienced ≥1 fall in the past 12 months based on the following categories: counts of (1) total, (2) indoor, (3) outdoor or (4) non-injurious falls; (5) one mild or severe injury fall (yes vs no); (6) an injurious instead of a non-injurious fall; and (7) an outdoor instead of an indoor fall.

 Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Using Tai Chi to reduce fall risk factors among older adults: an evaluation of a community-based implementation

17/05/2017

Source: Journal of Applied Gerontology

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Date of publication: 11th April 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to evaluate a community-based implementation of an evidence-based fall prevention program, in which 131 individuals participated in Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance. Self-report and functional performance assessments included demographics, health and fall history, the Activities-Specific Balance Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Functional Reach test. Pre–post scores were compared with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The mostly female participants were 73 years old, on average. At baseline, 18% reported being afraid or very afraid of falling, and 18% had fallen in the past 6 months. At follow-up, there was significant improvement in Timed Up and Go (p < .001), Functional Reach (p < .01), and Activities-Specific Balance Scale scores (p < .01). These results demonstrate that a 12-week evidence-based Tai Chi program can be feasibly implemented by novice instructors, is well-received by older adults, and can effectively reduce fall risk when implemented in community settings.

 Length of publication: 17 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Responsiveness of gait speed to physical exercise interventions in at-risk older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

17/05/2017

Source: Annals of geriatric medicine and Research 

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Date of publication: march 2017 vol. 21 iss. 1 pps. 17-23

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: In at-risk older adults, gait speed is an important factor associated with quality of life and falling risk. This study assesses whether therapeutic exercise could improve gait speed.

 Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Depressive symptomatology and fall risk among community-dwelling older adults

18/04/2017

Source: Social Science & Medicine, 2017, Vol 178 p. 206-213

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Falls are common among older adults and may be related to depressive symptoms (DS). With advancing age, there is an onset of chronic conditions, sensory impairments, and activity limitations that are associated with falls and with depressive disorders. Prior cross-sectional studies have observed significant associations between DS and subsequent falls as well as between fractures and subsequent clinical depression and DS. Using sophisticated methods and a large U.S. sample, this study found larger magnitudes of effect in the DS-falls relationship than in prior studies—highlighting the risk of falls for older adults with DS.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Is independence of older adults safe considering the risk of falls?

18/04/2017

Source: BMC Geriatrics

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Date of publication: 14 March 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The main objective of the study was to evaluate the degree of independence and find the fall risk factors in the study group.

 Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Paramedic assessment of older adults after falls, including community care referral pathway: cluster randomized trial

18/04/2017

Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine 

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Date of publication: 13th March 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The aim of this study is to determine clinical and cost-effectiveness of a paramedic protocol for the care of older people who fall.

 Length of publication: 39 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


The role of vitamin D in maintaining bone health in older people

17/03/2017

Source: Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease

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Date of publication: 14 February 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This review summarises aspects of vitamin D metabolism, the consequences of vitamin D deficiency, and the impact of vitamin D supplementation on musculoskeletal health in older age.

 Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


A narrative synthesis of nintendo Wii Fit gaming protocol in addressing balance among healthy older adults: what system works?

17/03/2017

Source: Games for Health Journal

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Date of publication: 22 February 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Balance is crucial in performing functional tasks particularly among older adults. Exergaming is gaining attention as a novel approach to enhance balance in a number of clinical populations. The aim of this review was to synthesize and present published evidence for Nintendo Wii Fit™ gaming system protocols. These include game preference, intervention setting, and exercise dosage for improving balance in healthy older adults. Commonly used outcome measures were also identified.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Experiences of health care for older people who need support to live at home: a systematic review of the qualitative literature

21/02/2017

Source: Geriatric Nursing

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Date of publication: 2nd January 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Perceived experiences of health care for older people who need support to live at home can illuminate areas needing improvement in quality of care, and guide towards better ways to support ageing populations to live at home. This systematic review synthesized findings from the qualitative literature about perceived experiences of health care for older people who need support to live at home, from the perceptions of older people, carers and health providers.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Promoting Older Adult Physical Activity throughout care transitions using an interprofessional approach

21/02/2017

Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners

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Date of publication: January 2017 vol. 13 iss. 1 pps. 64–71.e2

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The nurse practitioner plays a key role in monitoring and improving physical activity and function of older adults. Physical activity is an essential component of care management for all older adults, even those who are frail with multimorbidities. All physical activity, no matter how small, has the potential to impact functional independence and quality of life. Partnering with the older adult and caregivers along with interprofessional providers, such as a physical therapist or occupational therapist and community-based resources, facilitates the development of successful goals and plans and the implementation of activities to promote physical activity across the continuum of care.

 Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Health services utilization in older adults with dementia receiving care coordination: the MIND at home trial

21/02/2017

Source: Health Services Review

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Date of publication: 12th January 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article investigates effects of a novel dementia care coordination program on health services utilization.

 Length of publication: 24 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


The influence of older adults’ beliefs and attitudes on adopting fall prevention behaviors

21/02/2017

Source: American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine 

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Date of publication: 17th January 2017

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Among Americans aged 65 years and older, falls are the leading cause of injury death and disability, and finding effective methods to prevent older adult falls has become a public health priority. While research has identified effective interventions delivered in community and clinical settings, persuading older adults to adopt these interventions has been challenging. Older adults often do not acknowledge or recognize their fall risk. Many see falls as an inevitable consequence of aging. Health care providers can play an important role by identifying older adults who are likely to fall and providing clinical interventions to help reduce fall risks. Many older people respect the information and advice they receive from their providers. Health care practitioners can encourage patients to adopt effective fall prevention strategies by helping them understand and acknowledge their fall risk while emphasizing the positive benefits of fall prevention such as remaining independent. To help clinicians integrate fall prevention into their practice, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched the STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries) initiative. It provides health care providers in primary care settings with resources to help them screen older adult patients, assess their fall risk, and provide effective interventions.

 Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Relationship between falls and complementary and alternative medicine use among community-dwelling older adults

27/01/2017

Source: The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine

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Date of publication: 14 December 2016

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The objective of this study was to examine the potential relationship between different forms of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and falls among older adults in New York City.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.