Fall prevention in primary care using chronic disease management plans: A process evaluation of provider and consumer perspectives

03/12/2019

Source:Australian Occupational Therapy Journal

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 3 November 2019

 Publication type: Journal article 

In a nutshell:Falls are an important issue in primary care. General practitioners (GPs) are in a key position to identify older people at risk of falls on their caseload and put preventative plans into action. Chronic Disease Management (CDM) plans allow GPs to refer to allied health practitioners (AHPs) for evidence‐based falls interventions. A previous pilot study reduced falls risk factors using CDM pans with older people at risk of falls. This study aimed to conduct a process evaluation of how the intervention worked in the pilot study for providers and consumers.

 Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Strengthening family caregiving through innovative technology solutions

03/12/2019

Source: Innovations in Aging

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 3 November 2019

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Technology has the potential to enhance the repertoire of tools for family caregiving to address the complexities of caring for older adults. There are examples of technology-enabled interventions helping older adults remain independent and safe in their home; easing the financial, physical, and psychological challenges of family caregiving; assisting in the management of chronic illness; improving socialization and support; offering information and resources on a “just in time” basis; and improving the quality of care and quality of life for both older adults and their family caregivers. This session will review eight evidence-based, technology-enabled solutions for family caregivers, including technology solutions that address medication adherence, falls prevention, personal emergency response, remote monitoring, telehealth, dementia tracking, social engagement, and care training. Key drivers for successful application of these interventions (e.g., technology, analytics, user experience design) as well as barriers to scaling (e.g., accessibility, affordability, regulation) will be reviewed.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Fall-related deaths among older adults in British Columbia: cause and effect of policy change

11/10/2019

Source: Injury Prevention

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2019

 Publication type: journal article

In a nutshell: The British Columbia Coroners Service implemented a policy in 2010 advising the reclassification of underlying causes of deaths due to falls from ‘natural’ to ‘accidental’. This study investigates whether observed data trends reflect this change in practice, are artefacts of inconsistent reporting, or indicate a true increase in fall-related deaths.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

 


When will my patient fall? Sensor-based in-home walking speed identifies future falls in older adults

25/06/2019

Source: The Journal of Gerontology series A

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 16 May 2019

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Although there are known clinical measures that may be associated with risk of future falls in older adults, we are still unable to predict when the fall will happen. Our objective was to determine whether unobtrusive in-home assessment of walking speed can detect a future fall.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


‘Managing pieces of a personal puzzle’ — Older people’s experiences of self-management falls prevention exercise guided by a digital program or a booklet

08/04/2019

Source: BMC, research in progress

Follow this link for the abstract 

Date of publication: 18th February 2018, Vol. 19 iss. 43, pps. 1-12

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The aim of this study was to explore older people’s experiences of a self-management fall prevention exercise routine guided either by a digital program (web-based or mobile) or a paper booklet.

 Length of publication: 12 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Association between the discrepancy in self-reported and performance-based physical functioning levels and risk of future falls among community-dwelling older adults: The Locomotive Syndrome and Health Outcomes in Aizu Cohort Study (LOHAS)

20/12/2018

Source: Journal of the American medical Directors Association 

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: 5 November 2018

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A discrepancy in self-reported and performance-based physical functioning levels is often observed among older adults. This study investigated the association of discrepancy in self-reported and performance-based physical functioning levels with risk of future falls among community-dwelling older adults.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Factors associated with older adults’ enrollment in balance classes to prevent falls: case-control ctudy

20/12/2018

Source: Journal of Applied Gerontology 

Follow this link for the abstract 

Date of publication: November 18, 2018

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study examined the association of exposure to social marketing to promote balance classes, personal characteristics and other factors, with older adults’ balance class participation.

Length of publication: 14 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

 


An evaluation of a safety improvement intervention in care homes in England: a participatory qualitative study

26/10/2018

Source: Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 20 2018 pps 1-8

 Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A growing proportion of older people live in care homes and are at high risk of preventable harm. This study describes a participatory qualitative evaluation of a complex safety improvement intervention, comprising training, performance measurement and culture-change elements, on the safety of care provided for residents.

 Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.